Childs, Frederick Herbert, Jr., TM1

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Petty Officer First Class
Last Primary NEC
TM-0000-Torpedoman's Mate
Last Rating/NEC Group
Torpedoman's Mate
Primary Unit
1942-1944, TM-0000, USS Albacore (SS-218)
Service Years
1941 - 1944
TM-Torpedoman's Mate

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Year of Birth
1922
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Eugene Claude Ipox, Jr., TM1 to remember Childs, Frederick Herbert, Jr., TM1.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Leicester, MA
Last Address
Worcester, MA

Casualty Date
Nov 07, 1944
 
Cause
Hostile-Body Not Recovered
Reason
Other Explosive Device
Location
Pacific Ocean
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial - Honolulu, Hawaii
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Court 5 (cenotaph)

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

The USS Albacore (SS-218) began a patrol on October 24, 1944, and refueled at Midway Island on October 28th. There was no further contact with the boat after that date. Japanese records report a submarine exploding as the result of contact with a mine on November 7, 1944 and the Albacore was presumed lost on December 21st 1944. Torpedoman's Mate First Class was officially declared dead on December 13, 1945.
   
Comments/Citation

Service number: 6660485

Presidential Unit Citation
The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the Presidential Unit Citation to the United States Ship Albacore (SS 218) for service as set forth in the following citation:
For extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese shipping and combatant units during her Second War Patrol in the New Guinea Area from November 11 to December 30, 1942; her Third War Patrol in the Admiralty Islands from January 20 to March 11, 1943; her Eighth War Patrol north of the Bismark Archipelago from December 26,1943 to February 22,1944; her Ninth War Patrol west of the Marianas from May 29 to July 16, 1944. By aggressive and tenacious area coverage, the USS Albacore made contact on a speeding major enemy task force and, defying numerous destroyers and hostile aircraft which screened the valuable Fleet units on every quarter and the inevitable countermeasures, pressed home her attack. Brilliantly maneuvering between the menacing escorts to reach the center of the powerful enemy group, the Albacore, despite a last minute breakdown of vital fire control equipment, launched her torpedoes and demolished a 29,800 ton aircraft carrier. Skillfully evading severe counterattacks, this gallant fighting ship returned to inflict further crippling blows against the enemy by sinking seven ships, including a light cruiser and two destroyers, for a total of nearly 50,000 tons. The courage and steadfast devotion to duty of the Albacore's valiant officers and men reflected in this outstanding combat record and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

For the President
James Forrestal
Secretary of the Navy
   


Mariana and Palau Islands Campaign (1944)/Battle of Philippine Sea
From Month/Year
June / 1944
To Month/Year
June / 1944

Description
The Battle of the Philippine Sea (June 19–20, 1944) was a major naval battle of World War II that eliminated the Imperial Japanese Navy's ability to conduct large-scale carrier actions. It took place during the United States' amphibious invasion of the Mariana Islands during the Pacific War. The battle was the last of five major "carrier-versus-carrier" engagements between American and Japanese naval forces, and pitted elements of the United States Navy's Fifth Fleet against ships and aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy's Mobile Fleet and nearby island garrisons.

The aerial part of the battle was nicknamed the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot by American aviators for the severely disproportional loss ratio inflicted upon Japanese aircraft by American pilots and anti-aircraft gunners. During a debriefing after the first two air battles a pilot from USS Lexington remarked "Why, hell, it was just like an old-time turkey shoot down home!" The outcome is generally attributed to American improvements in pilot and crew training and tactics, technology (including the top-secret anti-aircraft proximity fuze), and ship and aircraft design. Although at the time the battle appeared to be a missed opportunity to destroy the Japanese fleet, the Imperial Japanese Navy had lost the bulk of its carrier air strength and would never recover. During the course of the battle, American submarines torpedoed and sank two of the largest Japanese fleet carriers taking part in the battle.

This was the largest carrier-to-carrier battle in history.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
June / 1944
To Month/Year
June / 1944
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  316 Also There at This Battle:
  • Beckwith, John Edward, S1c, (1942-1945)
  • Block, Charles John, CPO, (1938-1945)
  • Breaux, Calvin, SN, (1944-1946)
  • Cote, Arthur, S1c, (1943-1946)
  • Crowell, Marshall Medford, F1c, (1943-1945)
  • Dikel, Samuel, PO2, (1942-1946)
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