Craighill, Richard Starr, RADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
274 kb
View Time Line
Last Rank
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Last Primary NEC
111X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Surface Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1965-1967, Commander Antilles Defense Command
Service Years
1932 - 1967
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Rear Admiral Upper Half

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

97 kb

Home State
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Year of Birth
1909
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Kent Weekly (SS/DSV) (DBF), EMCS to remember Craighill, Richard Starr, RADM USN(Ret).

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
Not Specified

Date of Passing
Feb 07, 1980
 
Location of Interment
U.S Naval Academy Cemetery - Annapolis, Maryland
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Not Specified
   
Other Comments:

IF anyone has a photo of Rear Admiral Richard Starr Craighill please let me know so I may include it on his profile

   
 Photo Album   (More...



World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Luzon Campaign (1944-45)
From Month/Year
December / 1944
To Month/Year
April / 1945

Description
On December 15, 1944, landings against minimal resistance were made on the southern beaches of the island of Mindoro, a key location in the planned Lingayen Gulf operations, in support of major landings scheduled on Luzon. On January 9, 1945, on the south shore of Lingayen Gulf on the western coast of Luzon, General Krueger's Sixth Army landed his first units. Almost 175,000 men followed across the twenty-mile (32 km) beachhead within a few days. With heavy air support, Army units pushed inland, taking Clark Field, 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Manila, in the last week of January.

Two more major landings followed, one to cut off the Bataan Peninsula, and another, that included a parachute drop, south of Manila. Pincers closed on the city and, on February 3, 1945, elements of the U.S. 1st Cavalry Division pushed into the northern outskirts of Manila and the 8th Cavalry Regiment (organized as infantry) passed through the northern suburbs and into the city itself.

As the advance on Manila continued from the north and the south, the Bataan Peninsula was rapidly secured. On February 16, paratroopers and amphibious units simultaneously assaulted the islet of Corregidor. It was necessary to take this stronghold because troops there can block the entrance of Manila Bay. The Americans needed to establish a major harbor base at Manila Bay to support the expected invasion of Japan, planned to begin on November 1, 1945. Resistance on Corregidor ended on February 27, and then all resistance by the Japanese Empire ceased on August 15, 1945, obviating the need for an invasion of the Japanese Home Islands.

Despite initial optimism, fighting in Manila was harsh. It took until March 3 to clear the city of all Japanese troops, and the Japanese Marines, who fought on stubbornly and refused to either surrender or to evacuate as the Japanese Army had done. Fort Drum, a fortified island in Manila Bay near Corregidor, held out until 13 April, when a team of Army troops went ashore and pumped 3,000 gallons of diesel fuel into the fort, then set off incendiary charges. No Japanese soldiers in Fort Drum survived the blast and fire.

In all, ten U.S. divisions and five independent regiments battled on Luzon, making it the largest American campaign of the Pacific war, involving more troops than the United States had used in North Africa, Italy, or southern France.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
December / 1944
To Month/Year
April / 1945
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories

Memories
torpedoed by the Japanese destroyer Kawakaze. The explosion wrecked Blue's main engines, shafts, and steering gear, as well as killing nine men and wounding 21. Throughout the 22nd and 23rd unsuccessful attempts were made to tow Blue to Tulagi. She was scuttled at 22:21 on 23 August 1942 after all attempts to save her failed. Blue received five battle stars for her nine months service in World War II.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
USS Blue (DD-387) Sunk by IJN Kawakaze

  498 Also There at This Battle:
  • Albanesi, Thomas, PO1, (1943-1946)
  • Bagby, Henry Lawton, CAPT, (1941-1970)
  • Beckwith, John Edward, S1c, (1942-1945)
  • Block, Charles John, CPO, (1938-1945)
  • Bolmgren, Mary
  • Booth, Robert Douglas, PO2, (1943-1945)
  • Brewster, Donald, PO3, (1943-1946)
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011