Mundy, Robert, RMC

Deceased
 
 TWS Ribbon Bar
Life Member
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Chief Petty Officer
Last Primary NEC
RM-2319-Communications System Technical Control Supervisor
Last Rating/NEC Group
Radioman
Primary Unit
1993-1995, RM-0000, USS Crommelin (FFG-37)
Service Years
1971 - 1995
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Operation Desert Storm
Cold War
Order of the Shellback
Persian Excursion
Plank Owner
RM-Radioman
Six Hash Marks

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

59 kb

Home State
Texas
Texas
Year of Birth
1953
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Cherri Mundy-Family to remember Mundy, Robert, RMC USN(Ret).

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Katy
Last Address
22623 Elsinore Dr.
Katy, Texas

Date of Passing
Jan 11, 2016
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified


 Ribbon Bar
Surface Warfare Enlisted Badge

 

 Official Badges 

Career Counselor US Navy Retired 20


 Unofficial Badges 

Order of the Shellback US Navy Honorable Discharge Persian Gulf Yacht Club Navy Chief 100 Yrs 1893-1993

Navy Chief Initiated Cold War Medal Persian Excursion Blue Star

Cold War Veteran Cold War Veteran


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Not Specified
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Countries Deployed To or Visited

 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1971, Recruit Training (Orlando, FL), 167
 Unit Assignments/ Advancement Schools
HQ, RTC (Cadre/Faculty Staff) Orlando, FLNTC (Cadre/Faculty Staff) Bainbridge, MDNSA Naples, ItalyNAVCAMS MED
Washington DCNTCC OPNAV (Pentagon)School Assignments - StaffNAVCOMMSTA Diego Garcia BIOT
NSC OaklandUSNS Hassayampa (T-AO-145)HQ, Service School Command (Faculty/Staff) San Diego, CANCTS Guam
NAVCOMSTA Puget SoundCNO - OPNAVAdvancement Schools and CoursesNaval Center for Tactical Systems Interoperability (NCTSI)
USS Marvin Shields (FF-1066/DE-1066)HQ, Naval  Training Center (Cadre/Faculty Staff) San Diego, CAWahiawa, HINaval Telecommunications Center (NTCC)
USS Crommelin (FFG-37)
  1971-1971, HQ, RTC (Cadre/Faculty Staff) Orlando, FL
  1971-1971, RM-0000, NTC (Cadre/Faculty Staff) Bainbridge, MD
  1971-1973, RM-0000, NSA Naples, Italy
  1973-1975, RM-2343, NAVCAMS MED
  1975-1975, RM-2343, NAVCOMMDET Cheltenham, MD, Washington DC
  1975-1977, RM-2371, NTCC OPNAV (Pentagon)
  1977-1978, RM-0000, (RM) Radioman C7 School
  1978-1979, RM-2343, NAVCOMMSTA Diego Garcia BIOT
  1979-1979, RM-0000, NSC Oakland
  1979-1980, RM-2343, USNS Hassayampa (T-AO-145)
  1980-1981, RM-2318, HQ, Service School Command (Faculty/Staff) San Diego, CA
  1981-1984, RM-2319, NCTS Guam
  1984-1987, RM-2372, NAVCOMSTA Puget Sound
  1986-1986, RM-2371, CNO - OPNAV
  1987-1987, RM-0000, Career Counseling School, NTC San Diego
  1987-1987, Tactical Support Center (TSC), Naval Center for Tactical Systems Interoperability (NCTSI)
  1987-1991, RM-0000, USS Marvin Shields (FF-1066/DE-1066)
  1991-1991, RM-2343, HQ, Naval Training Center (Cadre/Faculty Staff) San Diego, CA
  1991-1992, RM-2371, Wahiawa, HI
  1992-1993, RM-0000, NTCC Camp H.M. Smith
  1993-1995, RM-0000, USS Crommelin (FFG-37)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1988-1988 Deployment - Western Pacific (WESTPAC) Cruise '885
  1988-1989 Counter Drug Operations
  1992-2003 Operation Southern Watch (Iraq)
 Military Association Memberships
Navy Together We ServedUSS Crommelin (FFG-37) Alumni AssociationUnited States Navy Radioman Association (USNRMA)Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA)
TWS Volunteer Profile Assistance Team (VPA)Navy TWS Advisory Group (NTAG)TWS Honor Roll
  2006, Navy Together We Served [Verified]
  2008, USS Crommelin (FFG-37) Alumni Association
  2008, United States Navy Radioman Association (USNRMA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2008, Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) [Verified]
  2009, TWS Volunteer Profile Assistance Team (VPA)1 - Assoc. Page
  2011, USS Marvin Shields (DD-1066/FF-1066) Association1
  2015, Navy TWS Advisory Group (NTAG)
  2016, TWS Honor Roll

 Photo Album   (More...


Reflections on CPO Mundy's US Navy Service
 
 Reflections On My Service
 
PLEASE DESCRIBE WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCED YOUR DECISION TO JOIN THE NAVY.
Robert Mundy, RMC - Please describe who or what influenced your decision to join the Navy.
I was born August 9, 1953, on Chennault AFB, Lake Charles, LA. My father George (RIP) was retired from the Army Air Corps after 20 years. He was a Purple Heart recipient. In 1970 I found myself as a high school dropout, no job, and a very bleak future. I lived with my mother and sometimes with my father.

I remember my older brother Wayne came home on leave from Vietnam in his dress blue uniform. I had always told my mom I wanted to be a lawyer when I grew up but I decided that I wanted to be a sailor just like my brother.
WHETHER YOU WERE IN THE SERVICE FOR SEVERAL YEARS OR AS A CAREER, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OR PATH YOU TOOK. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON FOR LEAVING?
I went downtown Houston to take some tests and a physical and soon found myself being sworn into the United States Navy. After a couple of months, I boarded my first airplane and was winging my way to NTC Orlando FL. After landing we boarded a bus and pulled up
Robert Mundy, RMC - Whether you were in the service for several years or as a career, please describe the direction or path you took. What was your reason for leaving?
to gates of hell. Strangers in uniform stormed the bus and began yelling curse words at us I had never heard before.

The first week must have been a blur because I have no memory of it. I do remember all of us standing at attention and the instructors were asking for 10 volunteers. I and 9 other people raised our hands. After they verbally abused us for volunteering, they then tore into the rest of our company for not volunteering. Boot camp was 12 or 16 weeks long. Lots of Marching, yelling, schools, classes, yelling and even more yelling. It went by fast. Next thing I knew I got orders to Radioman "A" school Bainbridge Maryland. I remember putting on my dress blues and my National Defense Service Medal the morning of graduation. I made it. I was a Sailor. I went home on leave. Everyone was proud of what I had done. Two of my best friends soon joined the Navy also.

After completing RM "A" school I received orders to the Naval Communication Station Naples Italy 1971-1974. My travel experience before this was vacation via car with my family from Houston to family in North Carolina. Now I'm on my way to Europe. I'm sure life on a navy ship is a lot harder than shore duty. I was 18 years old, had lots of friends my age and we had a blast. Work was interesting with an inspection or two thrown in. But being on my own with a real job and money was awesome. We traveled all over Italy. Rome, Pisa, Vatican city, etc. I advanced to RMSA, RMSN and then RM3.

I re-enlisted for orders to RMC7 school and orders to the Pentagon OPNAVTCC Washington DC 1975-1977. I really enjoyed living in the DC area. Lots to see and do. Working in the Pentagon was impressive. I advanced to RM2 while stationed there. I left in 1977 and stopped off in Houston on my way to San Diego for school.

I met my wife while on leave and we have been married for 38 years. Navy life is not easy for the spouse but Cherri was a true and supportive wife. After school in San Diego, I received orders to my first ship. USNS Hassayampa being overhauled and moored at the Army supply depot Oakland CA. After the ship was commissioned we got underway for the Indian Ocean. We were forward deployed and the ship was not coming back to Conus anytime soon. I was advanced to RM1 while aboard the HASS.

As you can see from my profile I still had many more ships and shore stations ahead of me before my career ended in 1995. After 24 years I retired aboard USS Crommelin FFG-37 in port Pearl Harbor HI Jan 1995 as an RMC(SW).
IF YOU PARTICIPATED IN ANY MILITARY OPERATIONS, INCLUDING COMBAT, HUMANITARIAN AND PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH MADE A LASTING IMPACT ON YOU AND, IF LIFE-CHANGING, IN WHAT WAY?
Robert Mundy, RMC - If you participated in any military operations, including combat, humanitarian and peacekeeping operations, please describe those which made a lasting impact on you and, if life-changing, in what way?
No combat. I am a Viet Nam ERA Veteran and a Desert Storm Veteran. I participated in Operation Southern Watch while aboard USS Crommelin FFG-37, during Western Pacific Cruise 1994. I am also a Cold War Veteran.
OF ALL YOUR DUTY STATIONS OR ASSIGNMENTS, WHICH ONE DO YOU HAVE FONDEST MEMORIES OF AND WHY? WHICH WAS YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Robert Mundy, RMC - Of all your duty stations or assignments, which one do you have fondest memories of and why? Which was your least favorite?
The most favorite was Comsec Custodian at NTCC Camp H M (Howling Mad) Smith, Camp Smith HI. As Comsec Custodian for Army, Navy, Air Force, & Marines, I was also the SAS/PAL custodian. SAS (Sealed Authentication System, PAL (permissive Action Link). I held Nuclear Weapons launch codes for all Commands from California to Japan (which as we know we can neither confirm nor deny the presence of Nuclear Weapons on U S Warships). I had a Blue team and Gold team handling these codes. Not one person could know both combinations to the safes where the codes were kept. It was called TPC (Two Person Control), TPI (Two Person Integrity). Very cool job.

Least favorite first Westpac cruise on USS Marvin Shields FF-1066 as an RM1. We did terrible as far as communications went. Forgot to shift our guard from EP to WP and thus lost hundreds of messages for the ship. No RMC or COMMO. Thought I was going to be demoted before it was finally all over.
FROM YOUR ENTIRE MILITARY SERVICE, DESCRIBE ANY MEMORIES YOU STILL REFLECT BACK ON TO THIS DAY.
Robert Mundy, RMC - From your entire military service, describe any memories you still reflect back on to this day.
Graduating Boot Camp. Making Chief Petty Officer. Being able to travel the entire planet. But when it comes to memories. It's the people that I met, worked with and mingled with over 24 years. Enlisted, Chiefs, Officers and Civilians. The United States Military is the largest most heavily armed non-profit family in the history of the world.
WHAT PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF FROM YOUR MILITARY CAREER?
I received my first Navy Commendation Medal (they did not give that to enlisted very often other than in a war time situations) in 1988. While on a WESTPAC cruise with Battle Group Charlie each ship was tasked with transmitting all radio messages via High Frequency (HF) between the fleet
Robert Mundy, RMC - What professional achievements are you most proud of from your military career?
and shore components. I had some very young but gungho radioman to work with. The first month's stats came out from the carrier and FF-1066 beat all ships in the battle group. For the next five months, we tore up the stats every month. One ship the USS White Plains had to explain why they were not sending enough messages using HF. They replied the USS Marvin Shields was hogging the airways. I spent many many hours in radio motivating and assisting my troops communicating with the battle group.

One month we did not have enough message traffic being generated on the ship and we were possibly not going to be out front of the other ships. I went to the XO told him about our situation. I said that the ship has a welfare and rec fund and that we could use the money to let crew members send CLASS E messages to loved one back home. It worked. For the entire cruise, we were #1. On our way back to home port I came into Radio and RMSN Johnson was sitting at the Teletype complaining that he could not find a good frequency to get messages out. I put my hand on his shoulder and said: " it's over son, we won." I think that all of my Radioman should have been given Navy Achievement Medals for their actions but each ship only has so many awards to go around. I can only hope that they each have the memories of those events as I do.
OF ALL THE MEDALS, AWARDS, FORMAL PRESENTATIONS AND QUALIFICATION BADGES YOU RECEIVED, OR OTHER MEMORABILIA, WHICH ONE IS THE MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?
Getting my Enlisted Surface Warfare Pin (ESWS). The USS Marvin Shields was really my first Navy Warship. My time spent on the USNS Hassayampa was more like McHale's Navy than the US Navy. I knew that getting qualified for this pin would not be easy. Most of the time aboard
Robert Mundy, RMC - Of all the medals, awards, formal presentations and qualification badges you received, or other memorabilia, which one is the most meaningful to you and why?
was spent in radio, mess decks, and berthing. I did my studying and visited spaces I never would have even thought of going to for months.

After getting everything signed off in my book I decided I was ready for my board and had one scheduled. Myself and an ET2 were trying to get qualified at the same time. After about 30 minutes of questions, I realized that I was not even ready to earn this Pin. I excused myself from board members explaining my reason why and left. I studied for the next six months and again scheduled myself for a qualification board. Needless to say, I passed my board and was awarded my ESWS pin in Radio Central by the Commanding Officer and Executive Officer.
WHICH INDIVIDUAL(S) FROM YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY STAND OUT AS HAVING THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOU AND WHY?
Robert Mundy, RMC - Which individual(s) from your time in the military stand out as having the most positive impact on you and why?
This is an extremely hard question to answer. I have been retired for 20 years since 1995. I can remember situations and places but names elude me. I can say that I mostly had positive interactions with most everyone I had the pleasure of serving with. You can't help but learn when you are surrounded by individuals from all walks of life and from all over the world.
CAN YOU RECOUNT A PARTICULAR INCIDENT FROM YOUR SERVICE, WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE BEEN FUNNY AT THE TIME, BUT STILL MAKES YOU LAUGH?
Chief Petty Officer Initiation and the days before the Initiation and ceremony. When the radio message from CHNAVPERS is received by each command containing the results of the selection of CPO's in all rates. Myself, Glenn Made, and Frank Aragon were on the list while stationed onboard FF- 1066.
Robert Mundy, RMC - Can you recount a particular incident from your service, which may or may not have been funny at the time, but still makes you laugh?
Let the fun began. You are called over the ships 1MC to muster in the CPO mess. If you don't show up you catch hell. If you do show up you catch even more hell. For 90 days until the morning of Sept 16, you put through some situations that test your morality, integrity, patience, and general well being as a person.

But on the other hand we had our moments and had lots of laughs on behalf of the Chiefs in the Mess. I was lucky enough to have my brother MAC Wayne Mundy (RIP) sit in on my initiation. He was fined $250.00 for being related to me. The 3 of us survived and to this day I have not forgotten my two brothers that endured those 90 days. I still keep in touch with Glenn via FB. Neither of us knows whatever happened to Frank.

I have a smile on my face while typing this and can muster a laugh now and then. My brother took lots of photos of my INITIATION that September day and I can honestly say I have never once looked at them. They remain in a box in our closet, and in my memories.
WHAT PROFESSION DID YOU FOLLOW AFTER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING, WHAT IS YOUR PRESENT OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY?
I chose Law Enforcement. My first job was with the Houston Police Department as a clerk typist. My job was to complete, scan, and document Criminal History forms on anyone that was arrested by HPD Officers.

I held the job for about two months before I saw that a small
Robert Mundy, RMC - What profession did you follow after your military service and what are you doing now? If you are currently serving, what is your present occupational specialty?
agency (Spring Valley Village Police Department) was advertising for a Police Dispatcher. Communications, right up my alley. After my initial interview with the Chief and Patrol LT, I did not hear from them for about 8 months and assumed I did not get the job. Finally, I got my call and reported for training. I thought the job would be a piece of cake. WRONG. I received one week of training and was then cut loose on the night shift where all the bad things happen. From my console, I have the capability to run any person by name and date of birth, drivers license or ID from every state and Canada. I get a printed copy within seconds of their driving record, prior tickets and possible warrants.

n the twenty years I have worked as a Telecommunications Operator I have confirmed thousands of warrants on drivers and passengers. I have confirmed hundreds of stolen cars. As a 911 Operator, I have dealt with everything you can imagine. Death, family violence, assaults, robberies, fires, ambulance calls, animal calls etc. My current job is 99 % boredom and 1% pure chaos. I sometimes find myself getting upset when the 911 rings until I answer it and ensure that the caller gets whatever emergency response required to help them. It goes from routine to an extremely dangerous situation in a heartbeat. It's a great shift when we all leave the building and go home to our families.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS SERVING IN THE MILITARY INFLUENCED THE WAY YOU HAVE APPROACHED YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CAREER? WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE SERVICE?
Robert Mundy, RMC - In what ways has serving in the military influenced the way you have approached your life and your career? What do you miss most about your time in the service?
Military Service builds a real sense of Patriotism.
You are squared away 24 hours a day in the Military. My job in Law Enforcement has me interacting with the public in person and on the phone 24 hours a day. Dealing with civilians is a lot different than dealing with military personnel. I have to be a lot more patient when I'm dealing with the public. Thank God most of the people that I deal with are Military Veterans. The Captain of Police is USMC Vietnam Vet. LT Detective is an Air Force Veteran. Court Clerk is Retired Navy. And a lot of the new younger officers are GWOT Vets. It's almost as if I never left the military.
BASED ON YOUR OWN EXPERIENCES, WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY JOINED THE NAVY?
Robert Mundy, RMC - Based on your own experiences, what advice would you give to those who have recently joined the Navy?
Take your job seriously. But have fun. I would have to say that I enjoyed each duty station sea or shore. Get an education. I am very disappointed that I did not get a degree after spending 24 years on active duty. If you stay in for one enlistment or make it a career, think of your future after the Navy and what you want to do. Plan for the future of you and your family. My family and I thank you for your service. We sleep well at night knowing my Navy is on patrol.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS TOGETHERWESERVED.COM HELPED YOU REMEMBER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND THE FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH.
Robert Mundy, RMC - In what ways has TogetherWeServed.com helped you remember your military service and the friends you served with.
TWS and the US Navy
I was lucky enough to find and join the site early in its inception. There were only 427 people on the site when I joined and a good amount of those people logged on initially but never came back. I quickly learned how to navigate the site and assisted new members with their profiles if they had any problems. I was soon asked to join the Admin team which I gladly did. I now do a daily search of all surviving WWII and Korean War Veterans and give them free lifetime memberships. I post a Thank you for your Service entry daily for the Profile of the Day, and Reflections of the Day. Thanks to this site I have met new friends by the hundreds. I have been reunited with shipmates from as far back as my first command in 1971 to my last command 1995. I have watched this and the other sites grow and improve daily. I'm proud to be a part of the team at NTWS.




KC 7/31/18

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