Peck, John, HM1

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Petty Officer First Class
Last Primary NEC
HM-8406-Aerospace Medical Technician
Last Rating/NEC Group
Hospital Corpsman
Primary Unit
1962-1966, HM-8406, NAS Norfolk
Service Years
1942 - 1966
Foreign Language(s)
French
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Cold War
Panama Canal
Plank Owner
Tailhook
Voice Edition
HM-Hospital Corpsman
Five Hash Marks

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
New York
New York
Year of Birth
1921
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Diane Short (TWS Chief Admin), SA to remember Peck, John (Doc), HM1.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Queens, New York
Last Address
Not Specified

Date of Passing
Nov 09, 2014
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified


 Ribbon Bar
Air Crew Wings

 

 Official Badges 

WW II Honorable Discharge Pin US Navy Retired 20


 Unofficial Badges 

US Navy Honorable Discharge Order of the Golden Shellback Cold War Medal Cold War Veteran

Cold War Veteran


 Military Association Memberships
Post 327USS Forrestal AssociationAmerican Association of Navy Hospital Corpsman (AAoNHC)United States Navy Memorial
Navy Together We ServedUSS Leyte CV-32 AssociationKorean War Veterans Association (KWVA)
  1966, American Legion, Post 327 (Adjutant ) (Norfolk, Virginia) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  1966, USS Forrestal Association [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1990, American Association of Navy Hospital Corpsman (AAoNHC) [Verified]
  1995, American Association of Navy Hospital Corpsman (AAoNHC) [Verified]
  1998, United States Navy Memorial [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2008, Navy Together We Served [Verified]
  2013, USS Leyte CV-32 Association
  2013, Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information

Last Known Activity
On retirement from USN, my wife and I bought a used 1979 VW Camper, we visited every state in US, and traveled from the Islands of Canada, across Canada, went on a 38 day expedition to Mexico, from "T" town, down the Baja, across the sound to the Main Land, visited thru out Mexico and returned to CONUS via AZ. Followed I-40 cross country to home, logging 7,800 on the VW, Needed new muffler and two tires.



When stationed at USN/MC TRNG CTR, Albany, NY, had a very interesting detail, my home base was 90 Church St., NYC, 3rd ND Hdqtrs. Was attached to 3rd ND, mobilization Team, we had to keep records of all HM's, if a disaster and/or mobilization, we could recall all HM's and Hospital personnel to ActDuty. Our area was from Albany, NY down to NYC.

  

Other Comments:
Served on Galapagos Islands, US NAAF, 1946, transferred to US NAS Coco Solo, CZ, Asst. to Flight Surgeon 15 ND.
1961- On board USS Randolph (CV-15) was attached to NASA Group for recovery of John Glenn. Corpsman in Isolation Chamber and Medical Isolation Team.
Made cruise on USS Eisenhower (CV-69)as part of Father/son cruise (Tiger Cruise) My son-in law was EMCM aboard the "IKE"

   

 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1942, Recruit Training (Newport, RI)
 Duty Stations
(HM) Hospital Corpsman A School, Fort Sam Houston, TexasBureau of Medicine (BUMED)Commander Naval Recruiting Command (CNRC)NAVSTA Philadelphia
USS Refuge (AH-11)USS Rehoboth (AVP-50/AGS-50)NAS Coco Solo, PanamaUS Navy
Naval Station NorfolkNaval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory (NSMRL),, Naval Health Research Center (NHRC)USS Leyte (CV-32)NAS Quonset Point
VP-26 Hurdy Gurdy/TridentsInstructors Training SchoolCommander Navy Reserve Forces Command (COMNAVRESFORCOM)School Assignments - Staff
USS Forrestal (CV-59)USS Randolph (CVS-15)NAS Norfolk
  1942-1942, HA-0000, (HM) Hospital Corpsman A School, Fort Sam Houston, Texas
  1942-1943, HA-0000, Naval Hospital (NAVHOSP)/Navy Regional Medical Center (NRMC)/Naval Medical Center (NAVMEDCEN)/Naval
  1943-1943, PhM-0000, Casco Bay
  1943-1944, PhM-0000, NAVSTA Philadelphia
  1944-1944, PhM-0000, USS Refuge (AH-11)
  1944-1944, PhM-0000, USS Rehoboth (AVP-50/AGS-50)
  1944-1945, PhM-0000, NAS Coco Solo, Panama
  1945-1945, PhM-0000, NAAF Galapagos Islands
  1945-1947, PhM-0000, NAS Coco Solo, Panama
  1947-1947, PhM-0000, Naval Station Norfolk
  1947-1950, HM-0000, Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory (NSMRL),, Naval Health Research Center (NHRC)
  1950-1951, HM-0000, USS Leyte (CV-32)
  1952-1952, HM-0000, NAS Quonset Pt Station Hospital , NAS Quonset Point
  1952-1955, HM-0000, VP-26 Hurdy Gurdy/Tridents
  1955-1955, HM-0000, Instructors Training School
  1955-1959, HM-0000, NMCRC Albany, NY
  1959-1959, HM-8406, Navy School Aviation Medicine
  1959-1961, USS Forrestal (CV-59)
  1961-1962, HM-8406, USS Randolph (CVS-15)
  1962-1966, HM-8406, NAS Norfolk
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1943-1945 World War II
  1950-1950 Korean War/CCF Intervention (1950-51)/Chosin Reservoir (Battle of Changjin)1
  1950-1953 Korean War1
  1962-1962 Cold War Event - Cuban Blockade
 Military Association Memberships
Post 327USS Forrestal AssociationAmerican Association of Navy Hospital Corpsman (AAoNHC)United States Navy Memorial
Navy Together We ServedUSS Leyte CV-32 AssociationKorean War Veterans Association (KWVA)
  1966, American Legion, Post 327 (Adjutant ) (Norfolk, Virginia) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  1966, USS Forrestal Association [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1990, American Association of Navy Hospital Corpsman (AAoNHC) [Verified]
  1995, American Association of Navy Hospital Corpsman (AAoNHC) [Verified]
  1998, United States Navy Memorial [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2008, Navy Together We Served [Verified]
  2013, USS Leyte CV-32 Association
  2013, Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page

 Photo Album   (More...


Reflections on PO1 Peck's US Navy Service
 
 Reflections On My Service
 
PLEASE DESCRIBE WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCED YOUR DECISION TO JOIN THE NAVY.
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - Please describe who or what influenced your decision to join the Navy.
My father was a Submariner in WWI, he served aboard the first submarine to transit the Atlantic under its own power (USS-E-1), left US SubBase, New London, CT and transited to the Azores and was on patrol in the North Atlantic.

My desire was to follow in his career, but I could not make the SubForce due to health restrictions. My service was all that I desired and it taught me all of my life's memories. I will pass this Navy life to my grandchildren. I met many fine shipmates and made friends from all over the world. My service during WWII was a great experience, I married a Navy Lady (WAVE) and learned more from her in many years of marriage.

I served with many fine Doctors and Nurses and learned a great deal of life experience, they trained me well and I went out on retirement with a lot more of schooling than I would have received in a learning facility.
WHETHER YOU WERE IN THE SERVICE FOR SEVERAL YEARS OR AS A CAREER, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OR PATH YOU TOOK. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON FOR LEAVING?
In August 1942, I joined the US Navy. After awaiting a call, I had signed up in May of 1942, but they were only taking Reserves at the time and I was told to wait until my draft notice had been assigned. After being sworn in at the Main Recruiting
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - Whether you were in the service for several years or as a career, please describe the direction or path you took. What was your reason for leaving?
Center in New York City, we were told to report to Grand Central Station for transport to NTS, Newport, RI for basic training. After basic training, an Officer Interviewer assigned me to Hospital Corps School at Great Lakes, IL (eight weeks of basic school, plus one week of nursing). My next Command was at USNH at Portsmouth, NH (the one in New England, not VA). I spent six months at that command and was promoted to PhM 3rd class within a four month training period. I reported to US Naval Recruiting Station in Portland, ME (Casco Bay Section Base Command).

While on leave in Nov 1943, I got married to a WAVE at NavSection Base, Portland, ME. She was a translator (French) for the Navy of Canada. On returning to my command, my duty chief told me my orders came in to report to USS Refuge (AH-11) at Philadelphia, PA. We sailed for Oran, North Africa after a shake down and sea trials.
IF YOU PARTICIPATED IN ANY MILITARY OPERATIONS, INCLUDING COMBAT, HUMANITARIAN AND PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH MADE A LASTING IMPACT ON YOU AND, IF LIFE-CHANGING, IN WHAT WAY?
Yes, the USS Refuge was assigned as a HosShip to transport POW's (German and Italian) from the No Africa Campaign to hospitals in CONUS. Our first trip was from Tangier to Charleston, SC (US Army Base). At sea we traveled along without an escort and our crew was Med personnel,
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - If you participated in any military operations, including combat, humanitarian and peacekeeping operations, please describe those which made a lasting impact on you and, if life-changing, in what way?
Nurses (55) female and Red Cross Women. Entering and leaving a port the ship always streamed for mines.Our CAPT was an ex-merchant skipper and he always wanted to be at sea.Three other trips from Southern France and Med ports to Norfolk, VA. My final cruise on Refuge was from France (1944) to Belfast, North Ireland. We were awarded three campaign awards for service.

Assigned to USS Rehoboth (AVP-50) in the South Atlantic, we carried ammo, hi-octane gas for blimps, stores and personnel for air bases in the Southern Atlantic region. We always traveled alone, making ports in the Caribbean and South America, and always on the hunt for wolf packs that were present in the Southern Atlantic. The German Navy had merchant ships that were gun-boats and flew flags of Nations, ie: Spain, Swiss, Portugal, then would open fire on Allied ships from concealed gun ports. Awarded Atlantic Campaign with battle stars.
FROM YOUR ENTIRE MILITARY SERVICE, DESCRIBE ANY MEMORIES YOU STILL REFLECT BACK ON TO THIS DAY.
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - From your entire military service, describe any memories you still reflect back on to this day.
Meeting and marrying my wife of 67 years.

FEB 1962: USS Randolph (CVS-15) was assigned to become flag ship for the Recovery Force (Atlantic) for the NASA project of LtCol John Glenn, Astronaut. Randolph was sent on station in the Caribbean to await the "splash down" of the Mercury Capsule. NASA asked for Corpsman to assist in the medical issues concerning the project. As the only AVT aboard the recovery vessel this writer was TAD to NASA. My assignment was in the isolation chamber aboard the carrier. The capsule of the Mercury Flight was dunked in the sea after entering the area. USS Noe picked up on radar and made speed to his landing. LtCol John Glenn was transferred to Randolph for examination and Isolation. President Kennedy awarded the Recovery Force the Presidential Unit Citation.
OF ALL THE MEDALS, AWARDS, FORMAL PRESENTATIONS AND QUALIFICATION BADGES YOU RECEIVED, OR OTHER MEMORABILIA, WHICH ONE IS THE MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - Of all the medals, awards, formal presentations and qualification badges you received, or other memorabilia, which one is the most meaningful to you and why?
During the Korean Conflict, on board USS Leyte (CV-32) the entire ship was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation and the Navy Unit Citation for action against the North Korean Forces, (Sep 1950-May 1951). I served with the Seventh Fleet after transit from Norfolk, VA to Japan, under a record speed for transit through the Panama Canal.

We lost the first Black Aviator in Action, LT Jesse Brown. He was shot down by a MIG and his wing man attempted to go to his rescue, crashing his plane in a snow bank, and then awaiting for a helo. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. I was assigned as Flight Deck Corpsman in Repair Eight. For action in Korea, we were awarded three combat stars.

Leyte covered the battle for Chosin and the Yalu crossing of the Chinese.
WHICH INDIVIDUAL(S) FROM YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY STAND OUT AS HAVING THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOU AND WHY?
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - Which individual(s) from your time in the military stand out as having the most positive impact on you and why?
My mentor was an MSC Officer (LT Carl Simmons). He was my division officer on the USS Randolph (CVS-15). He taught me many ways of approaching a problem, never drop your sense of direction and always look it up. Admit if you think there is a problem and find a way to solve it. When it was time for Quals he always explained your good and bad points. I thank him for his good insight.
CAN YOU RECOUNT A PARTICULAR INCIDENT FROM YOUR SERVICE, WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE BEEN FUNNY AT THE TIME, BUT STILL MAKES YOU LAUGH?
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - Can you recount a particular incident from your service, which may or may not have been funny at the time, but still makes you laugh?
At the time of the final days of WWII, all hands looked forward to being released from active duty. The USNR personnel needed points to get to the top of the list, all hands would discuss their points and try to out guess a shipmate.

As I was a USN (regular Navy) this did not apply to my status, most of division personnel would kid me, and call me a "Lifer". I took it in stride and still laugh when I think how these people served and "won the war for us". These points were assigned for time in service, time overseas and/or sea duty, medals awarded, basic good conduct and rank or rating if needed at the conclusion of WWII.
WHAT PROFESSION DID YOU FOLLOW AFTER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING, WHAT IS YOUR PRESENT OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY?
Computers were just advancing when my time for retirement was close and I made arrangements to go back to school and learn this new way of communicating. IBM gave me a four months course in the "old IBM card system", then I went to work for Sears.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS SERVING IN THE MILITARY INFLUENCED THE WAY YOU HAVE APPROACHED YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CAREER? WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE SERVICE?
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - In what ways has serving in the military influenced the way you have approached your life and your career? What do you miss most about your time in the service?
My life changed for the better, as a young man I had very little education and worked prior to my Navy service. All of life experience was given to me along with a GED, many college courses and Navy Training Schools. I had lived through the depression years and had to forgo any training or education. When applying for work, the Navy Discharge was held in high esteem.
BASED ON YOUR OWN EXPERIENCES, WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY JOINED THE NAVY?
Stay the Course. How many times I have heard, "Only if I had stayed in the service".
IN WHAT WAYS HAS TOGETHERWESERVED.COM HELPED YOU REMEMBER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND THE FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH.
John Peck (Doc), HM1 - In what ways has TogetherWeServed.com helped you remember your military service and the friends you served with.
I enjoy reading and seeing young men and women experience a service career. The system has changed, the pay now is great and advancement is outstanding. We did not have the Senior and Master rates. To Together We Served I say; "Well Done".

DB 9/1/2016

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