Young, Cliff R., ETC

Electronics Technician
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Current Service Status
USN Retired
Current/Last Rank
Chief Petty Officer
Current/Last Primary NEC
ET-1572-AIMS System Technician
Current/Last Rating/NEC Group
Electronics Technician
Primary Unit
1996-2000, ET-0000, Naval Special Warfare Group 2 (NSWG-2)/SEAL Team 2
Previously Held NEC
ET-0000-Electronics Technician
ET-1452-NAVMACS (V)3 Shipboard Maintenance Technician
ET-1571-AN/UPX-29(V) Ship System Maintainer
9502-Instructor
ET-9502-Instructor
Service Years
1976 - 2000
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Operation Desert Storm
Cold War
Decommissioning
Domain of the Emperor Penguin
Order of the Antarctic Circle
Plank Owner
Voice Edition
ET-Electronics Technician
Six Hash Marks


 Ribbon Bar

Surface Warfare Enlisted Badge

 

 Official Badges 

NATO Standing Naval Forces Mediterranean US Navy Retired 20 NATO Standing Naval Forces Atlantic


 Unofficial Badges 

US Navy Honorable Discharge Domain of the Emperor Penguin Navy Chief 100 Yrs 1893-1993 Navy Chief Initiated

Cold War Veteran Operation Deep Freeze III Cold War Veteran Multinational Peaekeeping Force Beirut




 Military Association Memberships
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW)
  1984, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1984, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
What are you doing now:
The 1st 8 years with Intel, I operated software-controlled wafer sorting equipment and microprocessor final quality control testing and inspections. Also, performs complex troubleshooting and repair of microchip testers and semi-automatic robot silicon wafer probers. Now I work directly in Fab32 as a quality control defect metrologist. inspecting wafers (at the sub-micron level) as they are being made. Its pretty intense, highly technical and detail-oriented work but I like mental challenges and its a living.
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   

 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1976, Recruit Training (Orlando, FL), 4211
 Duty Stations
NAVCOMSTA Rota, SpainUSS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13)USS Ticonderoga (CG-47)Naval Support Force Antarctica (NSFA)
NAB Little Creek/SIMAUSS Milwaukee (AOR-2)Instructors Training SchoolProfessional Schools and Courses
Naval Special Warfare  Group 2 (NSWG-2)/SEAL Team 2
  1977-1979, ET-0000, NAVCOMSTA Rota, Spain
  1980-1982, ET-1452, USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13)
  1982-1985, ET-1571, USS Ticonderoga (CG-47)
  1985-1986, ET-0000, Naval Support Force Antarctica (NSFA)
  1987-1990, ET-0000, NAB Little Creek/SIMA
  1990-1993, ET-0000, USS Milwaukee (AOR-2)
  1993-1993, 9502, Instructors Training School
  1993-1996, ET-9502, Advanced Electronic Classroom Instructor Training Course
  1996-2000, ET-0000, Naval Special Warfare Group 2 (NSWG-2)/SEAL Team 2
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1982-1984 US Multinational Force Lebanon Peacekeeping Mission
  1983-1983 US Multinational Force Lebanon Peacekeeping Mission
  1991-1991 Liberation and Defense of Kuwait/Operation Desert Storm
 Military Association Memberships
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW)
  1984, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1984, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Remembrance Profiles -  2 Sailors Remembered
 Photo Album   (More...


Reflections on CPO Young's US Navy Service
 
 Reflections On My Service
 
PLEASE DESCRIBE WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCED YOUR DECISION TO JOIN THE NAVY?
I grew up in the small country town of Clinton, SC. There wasn't much in the way of industry there except for the cotton mills. It was good money for those who worked there but from what I could tell when people retired from there they barely had two nickels
Cliff R. Young, ETC - Please describe who or what influenced your decision to join the Navy?
It was this big I tell ya !!!
to rub together afterwards. I was not interested in the least of living in a one horse town barely eking out a living all my life. I wanted to learn a viable trade and do some traveling. I couldn't afford either, so I looked at joining the Navy.

I was a little reluctant at first because I didn't really want to follow in my father's foot steps (he made EMC after 20 years). In fact, I had decided to join the Air Force. I could tell he was disappointed but he took me to Shaw AFB for my physical and I passed with flying colors. Three weeks later, I got a letter in the mail from the Air Force saying I had to come take my physical. I was surprised and a little concerned about how "squared away" the AF was. I was only planning to do two years and figured if it was a SNAFU trying to get in how much trouble would it be to get out. I went ahead and joined the Navy the next day. I signed up for the Cache program in January 1976 and entered boot camp in Orlando in August.
WHETHER YOU WERE IN THE SERVICE FOR SEVERAL YEARS OR AS A CAREER, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OR PATH YOU TOOK. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON FOR LEAVING?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - Whether you were in the service for several years or as a career, please describe the direction or path you took. What was your reason for leaving?
Tough Duty-Chillin' in St. Maarten
I was always a science buff and loved to learn about the universe and how things worked. When I was a kid I was always fascinated by the glowing vacuum tubes in the back of TVs and old radios. Later I become enamored by the smaller components like diodes, caps and transistors in the back of transistor radios. I signed up for 4 years with the Navy under the electronics program.

I went to BE/E and "A" school in Great Lakes, Ill. Man that place gets cold in the winter! Toward the end of "A" school I was offered a chance to graduate and go to my first ship (USS Grand Canyon out of Mayport) as a seaman deuce or extend for 2 years, get a "C" school and automatic advancement to ET3 (push button 3rd). Well that was a "no brainer" and I extended to 6 years. So much for staying for only 4 years!
IF YOU PARTICIPATED IN ANY MILITARY OPERATIONS, INCLUDING COMBAT, HUMANITARIAN AND PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH WERE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT TO YOU AND, IF LIFE-CHANGING, IN WHAT WAY.
The only thing I can honestly say was considered "combat operations" was way back in late 1983 (shortly after the Marine barracks in Beirut was hit by a suicide truck bomb). I was on board the first Aegis cruiser (USS Ticoneroga CG-47) doing "box ops" in the Med along with
Cliff R. Young, ETC - If you participated in any military operations, including combat, humanitarian and peacekeeping operations, please describe those which were the most significant to you and, if life-changing, in what way.
Operation Computex 1982
various other combatants including the USS New Jersey (BB-62). It seems that the Libyans were constantly trying to shoot down our F-14 fighter recon planes with triple A because they knew were taking photos of their positions and relaying them to the Israelis. Eventually we (all ships with 5" guns and bigger) received orders to take out all of the Syrian gunnery/artillery positions.

We were very excited because we'd been doing box ops for way too long. We all lined up one behind the other and let loose a hail of NFGS the probably hadn't seen since Vietnam! It was very cool and intense! I'll never forgot because at my GQ station my Chief made me and another shipmate lay down on the floor the RICER room behind the spare klystron coffin to protect us from return fire if any. There were some reports of splashes in the water near some of the ships but they could not be confirmed. Hence, no combat action ribbon. Darn!

OF ALL YOUR DUTY STATIONS OR ASSIGNMENTS, WHICH ONE DO YOU HAVE FONDEST MEMORIES OF AND WHY? WHICH ONE WAS YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My favorite sea command was USS Ticonderoga (CG-47) the first Aegis cruiser. We commissioned her in January 1983, went though intense work ups and deployed in 9 months! We were a proud hand-picked crew who knew how to get the job done because once on board we had to "hit
Cliff R. Young, ETC - Of all your duty stations or assignments, which one do you have fondest memories of and why? Which one was your least favorite?
Chillin' at home before my 1st Med Cruise
the deck running'. It was great being on such a formidable platform and being the envy of the fleet for years to come. In fact, I picked up Chief the first time up (at my 9 year mark) due to my exemplary performance on board.

My least favorite sea command was the USS Milwaukee (AOR-2) stationed out of Norfolk. It was an old (20+ years) 40K ton replenishment oiler (a floating 7-Eleven if you will) that was a workhorse for the fleet. We seemed to dock only long enough to refuel, resupply and head back out again. I clearly remember being told at quarters on a Monday that we would be deploying in lieu of another ship (who failed their OPPE) the following Wednesday. We were right in the middle of decom preps and had to re-install or radar and TACAN as well as CASREP to get any parts required to be ready to deploy. My baby daughter was born the day after we set sail (all leave was cancelled) and I didn't get to hold her until she was 3 months old (when the other ship finally got their act together).

My favorite shore command was SEAL Team 2. We were designated a deployable unit hence it counted as sea duty for rotation purposes. It was great working with such great bunch of proud and quiet professionals who will not accept failure at any costs. We fleet Sailors assigned as support also gravitated up to that level and had a superb symbiotic relationship with the "Team". I'd go back in a heartbeat!
FROM YOUR ENTIRE SERVICE, INCLUDING COMBAT, DESCRIBE THE PERSONAL MEMORIES WHICH HAVE IMPACTED YOU MOST?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - From your entire service, including combat, describe the personal memories which have impacted you most?
Task Force 60.
I remember all of the missile shoots we did off the coast of PR to test out of new Aegis weapon system on board the Ticonderoga (CG-47). It was a very exciting time for us to prove our capabilities especially with telemetry reporting repeated skin-to-skin missile hits. I remember our excitement when we were authorized to provide Naval Gunfire Suffort (NGFS) to target Syrian artillery positions in Beirut, Lebanon. It was especially cool when the mighty New Jersey fired her massive 16 inch guns in anger!

I also remember the CENTAM cruise we on in the Gulf of Mexico going from place to place performing good will projects for needy schools and villages in central and South America. We were once again cruising with the New Jersey and got to witness first hand a full broad (5" and 16" guns) of her guns as a demonstration for the president of Belize (who was on board the our ship, the Tico). It was awesome!!!
WHAT ACHIEVEMENT(S) ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF FROM YOUR MILITARY CAREER? IF YOU RECEIVED ANY MEDALS, AWARDS, FORMAL PRESENTATIONS OR QUALIFICATION BADGES FOR SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENT OR VALOR, PLEASE DESCRIBE HOW THESE WERE EARNED.
Cliff R. Young, ETC - What achievement(s) are you most proud of from your military career? If you received any medals, awards, formal presentations or qualification badges for significant achievement or valor, please describe how these were earned.
CO-XO at SEMs 1st Bday Jamaica
My 1st NAM was awarded for exemplary performance after our return from deployment in support of Operation Dersert Shield/Storm in 1991 while onboard the USS Miwaukee (AOR-2). I earned my 1st NCM as branch head/instructor of the IFF course at FTC Norfolk for student throughput, course reduction and costs savings. The 2nd NCM was from SEAL Team 2 for my superior technical acumen as the Commo who outfitted and deployed 15 operational SEAL platoons from Jan '97-Aug '00.
OF ALL THE MEDALS, AWARDS, FORMAL PRESENTATIONS AND QUALIFICATION BADGES YOU RECEIVED, OR ANY OTHER MEMORABILIA, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH ARE THE MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - Of all the medals, awards, formal presentations and qualification badges you received, or any other memorabilia, please describe those which are the most meaningful to you and why?
Relaxing at GITMO
I feel that the NCM (my 2nd) and especially the "Paddle" that I received from SEAL Team 2 have the most meaning to me. These guys don't just give out awards freely or quickly unless they truly believe that you've earned it. The NCM was a fitting end to a 24 year illustrious career where I had to "make it happen" daily and I really appreciated it. The "paddle" or oar was a surprise to me since it is normally only awarded to exemplary SEALs upon their departure from the Team. I'm not sure if they consider me and honorary SEAL or not. I guess it's best not to speak of these things. I treasure it most of all!
WHICH INDIVIDUAL(S) FROM YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY STAND OUT AS HAVING THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOU AND WHY?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - Which individual(s) from your time in the military stand out as having the most positive impact on you and why?
Ground Elex Gang
RMC Donnelly was a great mentor of mine when I was aboard the USS S.E. Morison (FFG-13). I was a young and cocky boot 2nd class comm tech who needed guidance at times. He was there when I need him since we had no ET Chief. Also, LCDR Free (my dept head) aboard the USS Ticoneroga (CG-47) was an inspirational leader who was firm yet fair and always had an answer no matter the question. Also, my father who was a retired Chief Electrician's Mate. He kept me on the straight and narrow when I was growing up. I have no idea where I'd be without his firm hand, guidance and wisdom.
CAN YOU RECOUNT A PARTICULAR INCIDENT FROM YOUR SERVICE WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE BEEN FUNNY AT THE TIME, BUT STILL MAKES YOU LAUGH?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - Can you recount a particular incident from your service which may or may not have been funny at the time, but still makes you laugh?
My Drinkin Buddie, Jenks.
When I was stationed on the USS S.E Morison (FFG-13), one of the guys in my work center was kind of a jokester. I think his name was Evan Davies. Anyway, he knew I was kind of a germaphobe (not the severe type) who was adamant about my hygiene. Well one day while standing in the chow line during supper, he "sneezed" very loudly and up close right on the back of my neck where I could feel the spray particles landing. I cringed and turned around with the intent of ripping his head off because he knew I didn't like that sort of callous disregard of my well-being! He was laughing really hard at first but once he saw the look on my face he quickly revealed a PMS bottle that he'd filled with water and set the nozzle on mist! I still think about that day and chuck a little.
WHAT PROFESSION DID YOU FOLLOW AFTER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING, WHAT IS YOUR PRESENT OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY?
In April 2000, when I was about 6 months out from my 24th year (High Year Tenure for a CPO), there was a big job fair at the Scope in downtown Norfolk, VA so I took a day off from work, put on my Sunday best and headed down there
Cliff R. Young, ETC - What profession did you follow after your military service and what are you doing now? If you are currently serving, what is your present occupational specialty?
Tour of Italy.
with a few resumes in hand. I perused some of the government contractors (Raytheon, Motorola, etc.) who made some of the equipment that I'd work on before but decided I didn't want to work for anyone who relied too heavily on government contracts (no contract = massive layoff I came ups). I came up on the Intel Corp. booth.

I'd heard of them before from the TV and radio commercials touting how great their chips were. They gave me two different interviews (a technical and a behavioral) right there on the spot. The told me that I was an excellent candidate to join the team and they'd send me an offer within the next 2 weeks. The offer came, I accepted and after I retired they moved me and the family out to the Phoenix, AZ area. I've been here in the desert ever since working as a manufacturing tech in the a huge factory (3 football fields long) making various flavors of desktop, laptop and server chips! So if you're going to buy a new computer, make sure Intel is inside (shameless plug)!
WHAT MILITARY ASSOCIATIONS ARE YOU A MEMBER OF, IF ANY? WHAT SPECIFIC BENEFITS DO YOU DERIVE FROM YOUR MEMBERSHIPS?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - What military associations are you a member of, if any? What specific benefits do you derive from your memberships?
Veterans of Foreign Wars
I belong to the VFW (life member) in Clinton, SC however since I don't get back home too often nowadays I haven't been to any meetings in awhile. There's a different branch here where I live but their meetings always take place on my work nights (I work night shift).
IN WHAT WAYS HAS SERVING IN THE MILITARY INFLUENCED THE WAY YOU HAVE APPROACHED YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CAREER? WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE SERVICE?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - In what ways has serving in the military influenced the way you have approached your life and your career? What do you miss most about your time in the service?
Finally, down and Dawg time.
Be a professional and be the best at everything you do. Remember, someone could be secretly watching you and using you as a role model. You can be a good example or something else but its all up you and your integrity. Also, volunteer every chance you get. There is always someone somewhere who needs help. Be that person who knows how to "pay it forward".
BASED ON YOUR OWN EXPERIENCES, WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY JOINED THE NAVY?
Cliff R. Young, ETC - Based on your own experiences, what advice would you give to those who have recently joined the Navy?
Education is the key for upward mobility
Get your quals and get 'em quick. Learn from the senior Sailors follow them around like a shadow (if they'll let you). Become the "go to" guy or gal when your team needs something done right the first time. Don't hang out with the wrong groups because there is still such a thing as "guilty by association."Don't let one bad instance sour your take on the Navy. We've all screwed up once or twice but it was a learning experience so learn from your mistakes and carry on smartly.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS TOGETHERWESERVED.COM HELPED YOU REMEMBER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND THE FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH.
Cliff R. Young, ETC - In what ways has TogetherWeServed.com helped you remember your military service and the friends you served with.
TWS and the US Navy
I like the way I can set up my profile for all to see my accomplishments, see my pix and read my stories. It's also great to reconnect with old shipmates as well!

*J*

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