Voris, Roy Marlin, CAPT

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
24 kb
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Last Rank
Captain
Last Primary NEC
131X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Pilot
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1958-1960, 131X, Carrier Air Group 5 (CVG-5)
Service Years
1941 - 1963
Captain
Captain

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

21 kb

Home State
California
California
Year of Birth
1919
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by PO1 Jeff Frey (Ace) to remember Voris, Roy Marlin (Butch / First Blue), CAPT.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Los Angeles, California
Last Address
Monterey, California

Date of Passing
Aug 10, 2005
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Cremated

 Official Badges 

US Navy Retired 20


 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
"Butch" Voris passed away in Salinas, California.


Blue Angels in the famous "diamond" formation. Aircraft: Grumman F8F Bearcat-1946




The Blue Angels exhibit their signature "diamond" formation during a 1952 show.
   
Other Comments:
  • The Father of the Blue Angels. Captain Voris, by direction of Chief Of Naval Operations, FADM Chester Nimitz who ordered the formation of a flight exhibition team (the first such official venture by any of the Armed Services) to boost Navy morale, demonstrate naval air power, and maintain public interest in naval aviation.
  • Captain Voris on the Blue Angels:
"You fly as close together as a couple of feet...every once in a while you do a little bump and so forth. People ask me, 'How close do they fly?' and I'll say if we hit each other, it's too close and if we don't, we're too far apart."

"It's the precision and perceived daring and high risk that you see in the team. We come down to ground level so people can see the types of maneuvers fighters do in combat. I think the public deserves to see what their taxes are paying for."
  • Inducted into the International Air Show Hall of Fame, in 2000, and into the National Museum of Naval Aviation, in 2002.
   
 Photo Album   (More...



Guadalcanal Campaign (1942-42)/Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands
From Month/Year
October / 1942
To Month/Year
October / 1942

Description
The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, 26 October 1942, sometimes referred to as the Battle of Santa Cruz or in Japanese sources as the Battle of the South Pacific, was the fourth carrier battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II and the fourth major naval engagement fought between the United States Navy and the Imperial Japanese Navy during the lengthy and strategically important Guadalcanal campaign. In similar fashion to the battles of Coral Sea, Midway, and the Eastern Solomons, the ships of the two adversaries were rarely in direct visual range of each other. Instead, almost all attacks by both sides were mounted by carrier or land-based aircraft.

In an attempt to drive Allied forces from Guadalcanal and nearby islands and end the stalemate that had existed since September 1942, the Imperial Japanese Army planned a major ground offensive on Guadalcanal for 20–25 October 1942. In support of this offensive, and with the hope of engaging Allied naval forces, Japanese carriers and other large warships moved into a position near the southern Solomon Islands. From this location, the Japanese naval forces hoped to engage and decisively defeat any Allied (primarily U.S.) naval forces, especially carrier forces, that responded to the ground offensive. Allied naval forces also hoped to meet the Japanese naval forces in battle, with the same objectives of breaking the stalemate and decisively defeating their adversary.

The Japanese ground offensive on Guadalcanal was under way in the Battle for Henderson Field while the naval warships and aircraft from the two adversaries confronted each other on the morning of 26 October 1942, just north of the Santa Cruz Islands. After an exchange of carrier air attacks, Allied surface ships were forced to retreat from the battle area with one carrier sunk and another heavily damaged. The participating Japanese carrier forces, however, also retired because of high aircraft and aircrew losses plus significant damage to two carriers. Although a tactical victory for the Japanese in terms of ships sunk and damaged, the loss of many irreplaceable, veteran aircrews would prove to be a long term strategic advantage for the Allies, whose aircrew losses in the battle were relatively low and could be quickly replaced. The high cost of the battle for the Japanese prevented their carrier forces from further significant involvement in the Guadalcanal campaign.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
October / 1942
To Month/Year
October / 1942
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  121 Also There at This Battle:
  • Harp, Edward Blaine, RADM, (1929-1961)
  • Prince, James, PO2, (1940-1946)
  • Rhodes, Raleigh Ernest, CDR, (1940-1961)
  • Siebler, Jerome, S1c, (1942-1942)
  • Snincsak, Theodore Michael, S2c, (1942-1942)
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