McCampbell, David Perry, CAPT

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Captain
Last Primary NEC
131X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Pilot
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1962-1964, Joint Air Defense Command
Service Years
1933 - 1964
Captain
Captain

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

65 kb

Home State
Alabama
Alabama
Year of Birth
1910
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by PO1 Jeff Frey (Ace) to remember McCampbell, David Perry, CAPT.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Bessemer, AL
Last Address
Riviera Beach, FL

Date of Passing
Jun 30, 1996
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
60 3150

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 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

Captain McCampbell passed away in Florida after a lengthy illness.

McCampbell is the United States Navy's all-time leading flying ace and top F6F Hellcat ace with 34 aerial victories. He was the third-highest American scoring ace of World War II and the highest-scoring American ace to survive the war. He also set a world single mission aerial combat record of shooting down nine enemy planes in one mission, on October 24, 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Leyte Gulf, in the Philippines.
   
Other Comments:

  • Commander of the "Fabled Fifteen" Nickname given to Commander Air Group 15 during WWII, due to, during 20,000 hours of combat operations, destroying more aircraft(318 airborne / 348 on the ground) and sinking of more enemy ships than any other Air Group of the war.

  • Most aerial victories by an American Pilot on one combat tour, with 34.

  • Navy's all-time leading "Ace" with 34 aerial victories.

  • 19 June 44, during the "Marianas Turkey Shoot" scored 7 aerial victories to become an "Ace in a Day"

  • 24 October 44, repeated the feat with 9 aerial victories. The only American to become an "Ace in a Day" twice.

  • Only Fast Carrier Task Force Pilot to be honored with the Medal Of Honor.

  • Namesake of the USS McCampbell(DDG-85)

  • Namesake of the terminal at the Palm Beach International Airport.

  • NOTE: Click Medals/Ribbons to "display as table". Each individual award write-up can be read by selecting the award. Scans of the awards also in the Photo Gallery.


   
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World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Iwo Jima Operation
From Month/Year
February / 1945
To Month/Year
March / 1945

Description
The Battle of Iwo Jima (19 February – 26 March 1945), or Operation Detachment, was a major battle in which the United States Armed Forces fought for and captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Japanese Empire. The American invasion had the goal of capturing the entire island, including its three airfields (including South Field and Central Field), to provide a staging area for attacks on the Japanese main islands. This five-week battle comprised some of the fiercest and bloodiest fighting of the War in the Pacific of World War II.

After the heavy losses incurred in the battle, the strategic value of the island became controversial. It was useless to the U.S. Army as a staging base and useless to the U.S. Navy as a fleet base. However, Navy SEABEES rebuilt the landing strips, which were used as emergency landing strips for USAAF B-29s. 

The Imperial Japanese Army positions on the island were heavily fortified, with a dense network of bunkers, hidden artillery positions, and 18 km (11 mi) of underground tunnels. The Americans on the ground were supported by extensive naval artillery and complete air supremacy over Iwo Jima from the beginning of the battle by U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aviators.

Iwo Jima was the only battle by the U.S. Marine Corps in which the Japanese combat deaths were thrice those of the Americans throughout the battle. Of the 22,000 Japanese soldiers on Iwo Jima at the beginning of the battle, only 216 were taken prisoner, some of whom were captured because they had been knocked unconscious or otherwise disabled. The majority of the remainder were killed in action, although it has been estimated that as many as 3,000 continued to resist within the various cave systems for many days afterwards, eventually succumbing to their injuries or surrendering weeks later.

Despite the bloody fighting and severe casualties on both sides, the Japanese defeat was assured from the start. Overwhelming American superiority in arms and numbers as well as complete control of air power — coupled with the impossibility of Japanese retreat or reinforcement — permitted no plausible circumstance in which the Americans could have lost the battle.

The battle was immortalized by Joe Rosenthal's photograph of the raising of the U.S. flag on top of the 166 m (545 ft) Mount Suribachi by five U.S. Marines and one U.S. Navy battlefield Hospital Corpsman. The photograph records the second flag-raising on the mountain, both of which took place on the fifth day of the 35-day battle. Rosenthal's photograph promptly became an indelible icon — of that battle, of that war in the Pacific, and of the Marine Corps itself — and has been widely reproduced.
 
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
February / 1945
To Month/Year
March / 1945
 
Last Updated:
Jul 3, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
Units Participated in Operation

VF-46 Men-O-War

USS Bismarck Sea (CVE-95)

 
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  550 Also There at This Battle:
  • Alseike, Leslie, PO3, (1944-1946)
  • Arenberg, Julius (Ted), LTJG, (1943-1946)
  • Bergin, Patrick
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