Faber, Thomas George, SK2c

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Petty Officer Second Class
Last Primary NEC
SK-0000-Storekeeper
Last Rating/NEC Group
Storekeeper
Primary Unit
1941-1942, SK-0000, USS Enterprise (CV-6)
Service Years
1940 - 1942
SK-Storekeeper

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

8 kb

Home State
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Year of Birth
Not Specified
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Sheila Rae Myers, HM3 to remember Faber, Thomas George, SK2c.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
West Allis, WI
Last Address
1333 S 75th St
West Allis, WI

Casualty Date
Oct 26, 1942
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Other Explosive Device
Location
Pacific Ocean
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Manila American Cemetery and Memorial - Manila, Philippines
Wall/Plot Coordinates
(cenotaph)

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

USS Enterprise (CV-6) departed Pearl Harbor on October 16, 1942 headed for the South Pacific, where with Hornet she formed TF 61, although Captain Osborne Hardison relieved Davis on 21 October. Five days later, Enterprise scout planes located a Japanese carrier force and the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands was under way. Enterprise aircraft struck carriers and cruisers during the struggle, while the Big E herself underwent intensive attack. Hit twice by bombs, Enterprise lost 44 men and had 75 wounded.
 
SK2 Faber was among the men killed in action. He was buried at sea the next day.
   
Comments/Citation

Service number: 3002314

Note: Although most sources have Thomas Faber listed as Storekeeper Third Class, the official muster rolls for the USS Enterprise (CV-6) show that he was promoted to Storekeeper Second Class in October 1942.

The information contained in this profile was compiled from various internet sources.
   
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Guadalcanal Campaign (1942-42)/Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands
Start Year
1942
End Year
1942

Description
The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, 26 October 1942, sometimes referred to as the Battle of Santa Cruz or in Japanese sources as the Battle of the South Pacific, was the fourth carrier battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II and the fourth major naval engagement fought between the United States Navy and the Imperial Japanese Navy during the lengthy and strategically important Guadalcanal campaign. In similar fashion to the battles of Coral Sea, Midway, and the Eastern Solomons, the ships of the two adversaries were rarely in direct visual range of each other. Instead, almost all attacks by both sides were mounted by carrier or land-based aircraft.

In an attempt to drive Allied forces from Guadalcanal and nearby islands and end the stalemate that had existed since September 1942, the Imperial Japanese Army planned a major ground offensive on Guadalcanal for 20–25 October 1942. In support of this offensive, and with the hope of engaging Allied naval forces, Japanese carriers and other large warships moved into a position near the southern Solomon Islands. From this location, the Japanese naval forces hoped to engage and decisively defeat any Allied (primarily U.S.) naval forces, especially carrier forces, that responded to the ground offensive. Allied naval forces also hoped to meet the Japanese naval forces in battle, with the same objectives of breaking the stalemate and decisively defeating their adversary.

The Japanese ground offensive on Guadalcanal was under way in the Battle for Henderson Field while the naval warships and aircraft from the two adversaries confronted each other on the morning of 26 October 1942, just north of the Santa Cruz Islands. After an exchange of carrier air attacks, Allied surface ships were forced to retreat from the battle area with one carrier sunk and another heavily damaged. The participating Japanese carrier forces, however, also retired because of high aircraft and aircrew losses plus significant damage to two carriers. Although a tactical victory for the Japanese in terms of ships sunk and damaged, the loss of many irreplaceable, veteran aircrews would prove to be a long term strategic advantage for the Allies, whose aircrew losses in the battle were relatively low and could be quickly replaced. The high cost of the battle for the Japanese prevented their carrier forces from further significant involvement in the Guadalcanal campaign.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1942
To Year
1942
 
Last Updated:
Feb 17, 2019
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  71 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Harp, Edward Blaine, RADM, (1929-1961)
  • Prince, James, PO2, (1940-1946)
  • Rhodes, Raleigh Ernest, CDR, (1940-1961)
  • Siebler, Jerome, S1c, (1942-1942)
  • Snincsak, Theodore Michael, S2c, (1942-1942)
  • Vejtasa, Stanley Winfield, CAPT, (1938-1970)
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