Knight, Fraser Sinclair, LCDR

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Lieutenant Commander
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1943-1945, USS Bonefish (SS-223)
Service Years
1936 - 1945
Lieutenant Commander
Lieutenant Commander

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Home State
Florida
Florida
Year of Birth
1917
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Kent Weekly (SS/DSV) (DBF), EMCS to remember Knight, Fraser Sinclair, LCDR.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Miami, FL
Last Address
Southern Pines, NC

Casualty Date
Jun 18, 1945
 
Cause
Hostile-Body Not Recovered
Reason
Other Explosive Device
Location
Sea of Japan
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
ME 25 (memorial marker)

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 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

LCDR Knight was the Executive Officer of the USS Bonefish (SS-223).

USS Bonefish was on a war patrol in the Sea of Japan with two other submarines. Her last communication was during a rendezvous on June 18th. Captured Japanese records indicate that a Japanese vessel was sunk on June 19th and that during an intense counterattack a submarine was sunk with all hands. It is presumed that this was the Bonefish. Lieutenant Commander Knight was officially declared dead 15 July 1946.
   
Comments/Citation

Service number: 085289

Silver Star
Awarded for Actions During World War II
Service: Navy
Division: U.S.S. Bonefish (SS-223)
General Orders: Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 368 (October 1947)
Citation: (Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Lieutenant Commander Fraser S. Knight (NSN: 0-85289), United States Navy, was awarded the Silver Star (Posthumously) for gallantry in action as Assistant Approach Officer of the U.S.S. BONEFISH (SS-223), during the SIXTH War Patrol of that vessel in enemy Japanese controlled waters of the Pacific, from 5 September to 8 November 19445. Lieutenant Commander Knight materially assisted his commanding officer in sinking three enemy ships totaling 22,000 tons and damaged two additional vessels totaling 8.900 tons. His gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.

Navy Unit Commendation
For outstanding heroism in action during the First, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth War Patrols in enemy Japanese-controlled areas of the Pacific. Harassed continually and several times bombed by watchful and aggressive enemy aircraft, the USS Bonefish boldly penetrated the most forward combat areas to effect wide coverage of her assigned sectors and strike fiercely at important Japanese surface targets. Consistently ready for combat under the superb handling of her gallant officers and men, she defied heavy escort screens; she developed her contacts with determined aggressiveness and launched gunfire and torpedo attacks despite the severest hostile countermeasures to sink or damage many ships vital to the enemy's continued persecution of the war. In addition to her valiant combat achievements, the Bonefish rendered splendid lifeguard services during air strikes against hostile territory, effecting the rescue of two friendly pilots. Her outstanding record of success under the hazards and difficulties of prolonged patrols reflects the highest credit upon the Bonefish, her courageous, fighting ship's company and the United States Naval Service.
   
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Pacific Air Offensive (1942-45)/Doolittle B-25 Attack on Tokyo
Start Year
1942
End Year
1942

Description
The Doolittle Raid, also known as the Tokyo Raid, on 18 April 1942, was an air raid by the United States on the Japanese capital Tokyo and other places on Honshu island during World War II, the first air raid to strike the Japanese Home Islands. It demonstrated that Japan itself was vulnerable to American air attack, served as retaliation for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, and provided an important boost to U.S. morale while damaging Japanese morale. The raid was planned and led by Lieutenant Colonel James "Jimmy" Doolittle, U.S. Army Air Forces.

Sixteen U.S. Army Air Forces B-25B Mitchell medium bombers were launched without fighter escort from the U.S. Navy's aircraft carrier USS Hornet deep in the Western Pacific Ocean, each with a crew of five men. The plan called for them to bomb military targets in Japan, and to continue westward to land in China—landing a medium bomber on Hornet was impossible. Fifteen of the aircraft reached China, and the other one landed in the Soviet Union. All but three of the crew survived, but all the aircraft were lost. Eight crewmen were captured by the Japanese Army in China; three of these were executed. The B-25 that landed in the Soviet Union at Vladivostok was confiscated and its crew interned for more than a year. Fourteen crews, except for one crewman, returned either to the United States or to American forces.

After the raid, the Japanese Imperial Army conducted a massive sweep through the eastern coastal provinces of China, in an operation now known as the Zhejiang-Jiangxi Campaign, searching for the surviving American airmen and applying retribution on the Chinese who aided them, in an effort to prevent this part of China from being used again for an attack on Japan. An estimated 250,000 Chinese civilians were killed by the Japanese during this operation.

The raid caused negligible material damage to Japan, but it succeeded in its goal of raising American morale and casting doubt in Japan on the ability of its military leaders to defend their home islands. It also caused Japan to withdraw its powerful aircraft carrier force from the Indian Ocean to defend their Home Islands, and the raid contributed to Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto's decision to attack Midway Island in the Central Pacific—an attack that turned into a decisive strategic defeat of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) by the U.S. Navy in the Battle of Midway. Doolittle, who initially believed that loss of all his aircraft would lead to his being court-martialled, received the Medal of Honor and was promoted two steps to Brigadier General.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1942
To Year
1942
 
Last Updated:
Nov 18, 2018
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  65 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Banzuelo, Antonio, MCPO, (1930-1960)
  • Harp, Edward Blaine, RADM, (1929-1961)
  • Meek, W. D., AN, (1941-1945)
  • Nowatzki, Richard, LCDR, (1941-1973)
  • Prince, James, PO2, (1940-1946)
  • Saunders, Billie, HR, (1942-1945)
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