Alessi, Jared, MM1

Machinists Mate
 
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Life Member
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Current Service Status
USN Active
Current/Last Rank
Petty Officer First Class
Current/Last Primary NEC
MM-4204-Steam Propulsion Maintenance Supervisor
Current/Last Rating/NEC Group
Machinists Mate
Primary Unit
2018-Present, MM-4296, USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6)
Previously Held NEC
MM-0000-Machinist's Mate
MM-9585-Navy Recruiter Canvasser
MM-4296-Shipboard Elevator Hydraulic/Mechanical System Mechanic
Service Years
2001 - Present
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Operation Enduring Freedom
Operation Iraqi Freedom
Order of the Rock
Order of the Golden Dragon
Persian Excursion
Safari To Suez
Suez Canal
MM-Machinists Mate
Four Hash Marks

 Official Badges 

Recruiting Command of Excellence


 Unofficial Badges 

US Navy Honorable Discharge Order of the Golden Dragon Persian Excursion Did the Ditch (Suez Canal)




 Military Association Memberships
Post 1512, Encanto PostAmerican Legion
  2004, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW), Post 1512, Encanto Post (Member) (Lemon Grove, California) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  2007, American Legion [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
What are you doing now:
Old Glory:
 
I am the flag of the United States of America.
My name is Old Glory.
I fly atop the world's tallest buildings.
I stand watch in America's halls of justice.
I fly majestically over great institutes of learning.
I stand guard with the greatest military power in the world.
Look up! And see me!
I stand for peace - honor - truth and justice.
I stand for freedom
I am confident - I am arrogant
I am proud.
When I am flown with my fellow banners
My head is a little higher
My colors a little truer.
I bow to no one.
I am recognized all over the world.
I am worshipped - I am saluted - I am respected
I am revered - I am loved, and I am feared.
I have fought every battle of every war for more than 200 years:
Gettysburg, Shilo, Appomatox, San Juan Hill, the trenches of France,
the Argonne Forest, Anzio, Rome, the beaches of Normandy,
the deserts of Africa, the cane fields of the Philippines, the rice paddies and jungles of Guam, Okinawa, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Guadalcanal
New Britain, Peleliu, and many more islands.
And a score of places long forgotten by all but those who were with me.
I was there.
I led my soldiers - I followed them.
I watched over them.
They loved me.
I was on a small hill in Iwo Jima.
I was dirty, battle-worn and tired, but my soldiers cheered me,
and I was proud.
I have been soiled, burned, torn and trampled on the streets of
countries I have helped set free.
It does not hurt, for I am invincible.
I have been soiled, burned, torn and trampled on the streets of
my country, and when it is by those
with whom I have served in battle - it hurts.
But I shall overcome - for I am strong.
I have slipped the bonds of Earth and stand watch over the
uncharted new frontiers of space
from my vantage point on the moon.
I have been a silent witness to all of America's finest hours.
But my finest hour comes when I am torn into strips to
be used for bandages for my wounded comrades on the field of battle,
When I fly at half mast to honor my soldiers,
And when I lie in the trembling arms of a grieving
mother at the graveside of her fallen son.
I am proud.
My name is Old Glory.
Dear God - Long may I wave.
   
Other Comments:
THE 'SNIPES' LAMENT
(Author Unknown)

Now each of us from time to time, has gazed upon the sea
And watched the warships pulling out, to keep their country free
And most of us have read a book, or heard a lusty tale,
About the men who sail these ships, through lightning, wind, and hail.
But there's a place within each ship that legends fail to teach.

It's down below the waterline; it takes a living toll.....
A hot metal living hell, that sailors call the "hole".
It houses engines run by steam that makes the shafts go round
A place of fire and noise and heat that beats your spirit down.
Where boilers like a hellish heart, with blood of angry steam.
Are like molded gods without remorse, are nightmares in a dream.

Whose threat from the fires roar, as like living doubt,
That any minute would with such scorn, escape and crush you out.
Where turbines scream like tortured souls, alone and lost in hell,
As ordered from above somewhere, they answer every bell.
The men who keep the fires lit, and make the engines run,
Are strangers to the world of night, and rarely see the sun.

They have no time for man or God, no tolerance for fear,
Their aspect pays no living thing the tribute of a tear.
For there's not much that men can do, that these men haven't done,
Beneath the decks, deep in the hole, to make the engines run.
And every hour of every day, they keep the watch in hell,
For if the fires ever fail, their ship's a useless shell.

When ships converge to have a war, upon an angry sea,
The men below just grimly smile, at what their fate might be.
They're locked in below like men fore-doomed, who hear no battle cry,
It's well assumed that if they're hit, the men below will die.
For every day's a war down there, when the gauges all read red,
Twelve hundred pounds of heated steam can kill you mighty dead.

So if you ever write their sons, or try to tell their tale,
The very words would make you hear, a fired furnace's wail.
And people as a general rule, don't hear of these men of steel,
So little heard about the place that sailors call the hole.
But I can sing about this place , and try to make you see,
The hardened life of men down there, cause one of them is me.

I've seen these sweat-soaked heroes fight, in superheated air,
To keep their ship alive and right, though no one knows they're there.
And thus they'll fight for ages on, till warships sail no more,
Amid the boiler's mighty heat, and the turbine's hellish roar.
So when you see a ship pull out, to meet a warlike foe,
Remember faintly, if you can, "THE MEN WHO SAIL BELOW".

*****************************************************************************



"It is not the critic who counts, or the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.  The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, wose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who, at best, knows in the end the truimph of high achievement; and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat."
-Theodore Roosevelt

***********************************************************

THE FIREMEN'S PRAYER

When I am called to duty, God
whenever flames may rage,
Give me the strength to save some life
Whatever be its age.

Help me to embrace a little child
Before it??s too late,
Or some older person
from the horror of that fate.

Enable me to be alert
And hear the weakest shout,
And quickly and efficiently
to put the fire out.

I want to fill my calling
and give the best in me,
To guard my neighbor
And protect his property.

And if according to Your will
I have to lose my life,
Please bless with Your protecting hand
My children and my wife

   
 Countries Deployed To or Visited

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OIF/Iraqi Governance (2004-05)
Start Year
2004
End Year
2005

Description
In June 2004, under the auspices of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1546 the Coalition transferred limited sovereignty to a caretaker government, whose first act was to begin the trial of Saddam Hussein. The government began the process of moving towards elections, though the insurgency, and the lack of cohesion within the government itself, led to repeated delays.

Militia leader Muqtada al-Sadr used his grass-roots organization and Mahdi Militia of over a thousand armed men to take control of the streets of Baghdad. The CPA soon realized it had lost control and closed down his popular newspaper. This resulted in mass anti-American demonstrations. The CPA then attempted to arrest al-Sadr on murder charges. He defied the American military by taking refuge in the Holy City of Najaf.

Through the months of July and August, a series of skirmishes in and around Najaf culminated with the Imman Ali Mosque itself under siege, only to have a peace deal brokered by al-Sistani in late August. Al-Sadr then declared a national cease fire, and opened negotiations with the American and government forces. His militia was incorporated into the Iraqi security forces and al-Sadr is now a special envoy. This incident was the turning point in the failed American efforts to install Ahmed Chalabi as leader of the interim government. The CPA then put Iyad Allawi in power; ultimately he was only marginally more popular than Chalabi.

The Allawi government, with significant numbers of holdovers from the Coalition Provisional Authority, began to engage in attempts to secure control of the oil infrastructure, the source of Iraq's foreign currency, and control of the major cities of Iraq. The continuing insurgencies, poor state of the Iraqi Army, disorganized condition of police and security forces, as well as the lack of revenue hampered their efforts to assert control. In addition, both former Ba'athist elements and militant Shia groups engaged in sabotage, terrorism, open rebellion, and establishing their own security zones in all or part of a dozen cities. The Allawi government vowed to crush resistance, using U.S. troops, but at the same time negotiated with Muqtada al-Sadr.

Offensives and counteroffensives

Beginning 8 November, American and Iraqi forces invaded the militant stronghold of Fallujah in Operation Phantom Fury, killing and capturing many insurgents. Many rebels were thought to have fled the city before the invasion. U.S.-backed figures put insurgency losses at over 2,000. It was the bloodiest single battle for the U.S. in the war, with 92 Americans dead and several hundred wounded. A video showing the killing of at least one unarmed and wounded man by an American serviceman surfaced, throwing renewed doubt and outrage at the efficiency of the U.S. occupation. The Marine was later cleared of any wrongdoing because the Marines had been warned that the enemy would sometimes feign death and booby-trap bodies as a tactic to lure Marines to their deaths. November was the deadliest month of the occupation for coalition troops, surpassing April.

Another offensive was launched by insurgents during the month of November in Mosul. U.S. forces backed by peshmerga fighters launched a counteroffensive which resulted in the Battle of Mosul (2004). The fighting in Mosul occurred concurrently with the fighting in Fallujah and attributed to the high number of American casualties taken that month.

In December, 14 American soldiers were killed and over a hundred injured when an explosion struck an open-tent mess hall in Mosul, where President Bush had spent Thanksgiving with troops the year before. The explosion is believed to have come from a suicide bomber.

After a review of the military strategy in the end of 2004, then commanding general of the MNF-I, General George W. Casey, Jr. directed the Coalition forces to shift their focus from fighting insurgents to training Iraqis. At the time, the Iraqi insurgency was mainly directed against the occupation and it was believed that if the Coalition would reduce its presence then the insurgency would diminish. Military planners hoped that national elections would change the perception of being under occupation, stabilize the situation and allow the Coalition to reduce its presence.

2005
Iraqi elections and aftermath

Voters in the 2005 Iraqi legislative election
Main article: Iraqi legislative election, January 2005
On 30 January, an election for a government to draft a permanent constitution took place. Although some violence and lack of widespread Sunni Arab participation marred the event, most of the eligible Kurd and Shia populace participated. On 4 February, Paul Wolfowitz announced that 15,000 U.S. troops whose tours of duty had been extended in order to provide election security would be pulled out of Iraq by the next month.[18] February, March and April proved to be relatively peaceful months compared to the carnage of November and January, with insurgent attacks averaging 30 a day from the average 70.

Hopes for a quick end to an insurgency and a withdrawal of U.S. troops were dashed at the advent of May, Iraq's bloodiest month since the invasion of U.S. forces in March and April 2003. Suicide bombers, believed to be mainly disheartened Iraqi Sunni Arabs, Syrians and Saudis, tore through Iraq. Their targets were often Shia gatherings or civilian concentrations mainly of Shias. As a result, over 700 Iraqi civilians died in that month, as well as 79 U.S. soldiers.


A large weapons cache in New Ubaydi is destroyed
During early and mid-May, the U.S. also launched Operation Matador, an assault by around 1,000 Marines in the ungoverned region of western Iraq. Its goal was the closing of suspected insurgent supply routes of volunteers and material from Syria, and with the fight they received their assumption proved correct. Fighters armed with flak jackets (unseen in the insurgency by this time) and sporting sophisticated tactics met the Marines, eventually inflicting 30 U.S. casualties by the operation's end, and suffering 125 casualties themselves.

The Marines succeeded, recapturing the whole region and even fighting insurgents all the way to the Syrian border, where they were forced to stop (Syrian residents living near the border heard the American bombs very clearly during the operation). The vast majority of these armed and trained insurgents quickly dispersed before the U.S. could bring the full force of its firepower on them, as it did in Fallujah.

Announcements and renewed fighting
On 14 August 2005 the Washington Post quoted one anonymous U.S. senior official expressing that "the United States no longer expects to see a model new democracy, a self-supporting oil industry or a society in which the majority of people are free from serious security or economic challenges... 'What we expected to achieve was never realistic given the timetable or what unfolded on the ground'".

On 22 September 2005, Prince Saud al-Faisal, the Saudi foreign minister, said he had warned the Bush administration that Iraq was hurtling toward disintegration, and that the election planned for December was unlikely to make any difference. U.S. officials immediately made statements rejecting this view.

Constitutional ratification and elections

The National Assembly elected in January had drafted a new constitution to be ratified in a national referendum on 15 October 2005. For ratification, the constitution required a majority of national vote, and could be blocked by a two thirds "no" vote in each of at least three of the 18 governorates. In the actual vote, 79% of the voters voted in favor, and there was a two thirds "no" vote in only two governorates, both predominantly Sunni. The new Constitution of Iraq was ratified and took effect. Sunni turnout was substantially heavier than for the January elections, but insufficient to block ratification.

Elections for a new Iraqi National Assembly were held under the new constitution on 15 December 2005. This election used a proportional system, with approximately 25% of the seats required to be filled by women. After the election, a coalition government was formed under the leadership of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, with Jalal Talabani as president.             
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
2004
To Year
2005
 
Last Updated:
Oct 20, 2017
   
Personal Memories

People You Remember
Part of WESTPAC 2004

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  5023 Also There at This Battle:
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  • Abadilla, Eugene, SCPO, (1985-2008)
  • Abbott, Nicholas, PO2, (2001-2007)
  • Aber, Chris, PO1, (1999-2006)
  • Abernethy, Justen, PO1, (2003-Present)
  • Abrams, Leonard, SCPO, (1987-Present)
  • Abshire (Milne), Lera, PO3, (2000-2008)
  • ABUNDIS, FERNANDO, PO2, (2000-2008)
  • Acevedo, Jeffrey, CPO, (1994-Present)
  • Acevedo, Joe, SCPO, (1986-2008)
  • Achay, Eduardo, PO1, (1990-2007)
  • Ackerman, William, PO1, (1994-2007)
  • Ackerson, Harry, PO1, (2000-Present)
  • Ackman, Michael, LTJG, (2003-Present)
  • Acord, C. R., CPO, (1985-2008)
  • Acosta, Cindy, PO3, (2003-2007)
  • Acosta, Jorge, CPO, (1998-Present)
  • Acuna, J. Gary, CPO, (1990-2007)
  • Adames, Javier, PO1, (1996-2008)
  • Adami, Bruce, PO2, (2001-2008)
  • Adams, Bennett, PO1, (1999-Present)
  • Adams, Jack, SCPO, (1987-Present)
  • Adams, Mark, CPO, (1983-2012)
  • Adams, Travis, LT, (1990-Present)
  • Adauto, Chris, PO2, (1989-2009)
  • Addis, Michael, PO2, (2000-2006)
  • Additon, Robert, PO2, (2000-2007)
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  • Adkins, Brent, PO2, (2000-2007)
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  • Adkins, Joshua, PO1, (2000-2007)
  • Adkins, Michael, PO3, (2004-Present)
  • Adkins, Sherman, PO1, (2003-Present)
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  • Agosto, Ivan, PO1, (2004-Present)
  • Aguilar, Benny, PO2, (2000-Present)
  • Aguilar, Daniel, PO2, (2001-2007)
  • Aguilar, Leomarc, PO2, (1996-2010)
  • Aguillon, Joel, PO2, (2000-2007)
  • Aguinaldo, Ronald, PO3, (2002-2007)
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  • Ahlstrom, Erik, CPO, (1995-Present)
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  • Akers, Matthew, SCPO, (1994-Present)
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  • Alamo, Ilsa, PO3, (2004-2008)
  • [Name Withheld], (1990-2015)
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  • Alcocer, William, LCDR, (1995-Present)
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  • Alexander, Daniel, PO2, (2003-2007)
  • Alexander, David, CWO3, (1985-2010)
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  • Alexander, Tashondia, PO1, (2000-Present)
  • Alexander, William, CWO2, (1984-2008)
  • Alexandria, William, SCPO, (1989-Present)
  • Ali, Jorge, PO1, (2000-2007)
  • Alip, Kekoa, CPO, (1998-Present)
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  • Allen, Benneshea, PO2, (2001-2011)
  • Allen, Charlie, CPO, (1995-Present)
  • Allen, David, SCPO, (1989-Present)
  • Allen, Derek, CPO, (1990-Present)
  • Allen, Jacob, PO3, (2005-2007)
  • Allen, Marlin, PO1, (2004-2008)
  • Allen, Sheronda, PO2, (2000-2009)
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  • Allison, Amanda, HA, (2004-2007)
  • Allred, Caroline, PO3, (2003-2007)
  • Allred, Dale, PO1, (1999-Present)
  • Alonzo, Victor, CPO, (1997-2008)
  • Alquist, Allen, PO1, (1988-2008)
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