Blackmon, Edward Brown, CPhM

Fallen
 
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Last Rank
Chief Petty Officer
Last Primary NEC
PhM-0000-Pharmacist Mate
Last Rating/NEC Group
Pharmacist's Mate
Primary Unit
1943-1944, PhM-0000, USS Albacore (SS-218)
Service Years
1936 - 1944
PhM-Pharmacist's Mate
Two Hash Marks

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Alabama
Alabama
Year of Birth
1918
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Nicole Summers, MMFN to remember Blackmon, Edward Brown, CPhM.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Bay Minette
Last Address
Not Specified

Casualty Date
Nov 07, 1944
 
Cause
Hostile, Died while Missing
Reason
Lost At Sea-Unrecovered
Location
Japan
Conflict
USS Albacore (SS-218)
Location of Interment
Courts of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial - Honolulu, Hawaii
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Court 5 (cenotaph)

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 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

The Albacore began a patrol on October 24, 1944, and refueled at Midway Island on October 28th. There was no further contact with the boat after that date. Japanese records report a submarine exploding as the result of contact with a mine on November 7, 1944 and the Albacore was presumed lost on December 21st 1944. Chief Pharmacist's Mate was officially declared dead on December 13, 1945.
   
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New Guinea Campaign (1943-44)/Battle of Arawe
Start Year
1943
End Year
1944

Description
The Battle of Arawe was fought between Allied and Japanese forces during the New Britain Campaign of World War II. The battle formed part of the Allied Operation Cartwheel, and had the objective of serving as a diversion before a larger landing at Cape Gloucester in late December 1943. The Japanese military was expecting an Allied offensive in western New Britain, and was reinforcing the region at the time of the Allied landing in the Arawe area on 15 December 1943. The Allies secured Arawe after about a month of intermittent fighting with the outnumbered Japanese force.

Initial Allied goals for the landing at Arawe included securing a base for American PT boats and diverting Japanese forces away from Cape Gloucester. The PT boat base was subsequently deemed unnecessary and was never built. Only a small Japanese force was stationed at Arawe at the time, although reinforcements were en route. The main Allied landing on 15 December was successful, despite a failed subsidiary landing and problems coordinating the landing craft. American forces quickly secured a beachhead and dug in. Japanese air units made large-scale raids against the Arawe area in the days after the landing, and in late December Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) troops unsuccessfully counterattacked the American force. In mid-January 1944 the American force, reinforced with additional infantry and tanks, launched a brief offensive that pushed the Japanese back. The Japanese units at Arawe withdrew from the area towards the end of February as part of a general retreat from western New Britain.

There is no consensus among historians on whether the Allied offensive at Arawe was necessary. While some have argued that the landing served as a useful diversion ahead of the Cape Gloucester operation, others believe that the entire campaign in western New Britain was unnecessary, and that the force employed at Arawe could have been better used elsewhere.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1944
To Year
1944
 
Last Updated:
Apr 2, 2018
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  13 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Trammel, Sydney, PO3
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