Cook, Carlton Hubbard, BM2c

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class
Last Primary NEC
BM-0000-Boatswain's Mate
Last Rating/NEC Group
Boatswain's Mate
Primary Unit
1943-1945, BM-0000, USS Dortch (DD-670)
Service Years
1936 - 1945
BM-Boatswain's Mate
Two Hash Marks

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

105 kb

Home State
Virginia
Virginia
Year of Birth
1916
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Gary Cook (Doc), HM1 to remember Cook, Carlton Hubbard, BM2c.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Avon
Last Address
Waynesburg, VA

Casualty Date
Feb 18, 1945
 
Cause
Hostile, Died of Wounds
Reason
Multiple Fragmentation Wounds
Location
Pacific Ocean
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Hebron Baptist Church Cemetery - Afton, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Cenotaph

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
World War II FallenUnited States Navy Memorial The National Gold Star Family RegistryWW II Memorial National Registry
  2014, World War II Fallen [Verified]
  2014, United States Navy Memorial - Assoc. Page
  2014, The National Gold Star Family Registry
  2014, WW II Memorial National Registry


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
On 10 February 1945, the USS Dortch sortied in a scouting line ahead of Task Force 58 for the strike on the Tokyo Bay area of 16 and 17 February 1945.

On the following day, the Dortch with the USS Clarence K. Bronson (DD-668) attacked and seriously damaged an enemy picket vessel.  The Dortch received 14 casualties in the action. 

PO2 Carlton Cook died on the early morning of 18 Feb 1945, followng the engagement.
   
Comments/Citation
Not Specified
   


New Guinea Campaign (1943-44)/Operation Reckless
Start Year
1944
End Year
1944

Description
The Battle of Hollandia (code-named Operation Reckless) was an engagement between American and Japanese forces during World war II. It took place in spring of 1944 and was part of the New Guinea campaign. The landings were undertaken simultaneously with the amphibious landings at Aitape ("Operation Persecution") to the east. The battle was an unqualified success for the US forces, resulting in a withdrawal by the Japanese to a new strategic defence line in the west of New Guinea and the abandonment of all positions in the east of the island.

Initial operations commenced in the second week of March 1944 with air raids by the Fast Carrier Force on Palau and islands in the Carolines, while aircraft of the US 5th Air Force and the RAAF attacked Japanese airfields along the New Guinea coast from Wewak to the Vogelkop and on Biak Island.

On 30 March and continuing to 3 April these air forces attacked Hollandia itself and the airfields on the Sentani plain. Achieving complete surprise they were able to destroy nearly 100 aircraft on the ground, leaving 6 Air Div unable to resist the planned invasion.

On 16 to 18 April the amphibious forces sailed from their bases at Finschafen and Goodenough Island, taking evasive routes to confuse their intentions until they arrived off Hollandia during the night of 21/22 April. The landings took place at dawn on 22 April after a supporting naval bombardment at each site.

At Tanahmera Bay the two RCT’s from 24 Div. were able to land without opposition, but found the beach to be highly unsuitable. Backed by a swamp just 30 yards from the shoreline, and with just one exit trail unsuitable for vehicles, Tanahmera Bay was quickly written off as a landing site; while the infantry already ashore pressed on to the Sentani plain the remainder of 24 Div was diverted to Humboldt Bay, which had by this time been secured. After four days under these conditions the two units had reached the western airfield and on 26 April it was secured.

Meanwhile at Humboldt Bay 41 Div. also achieved complete surprise, and though the beaches were defended after the naval bombardment the Japanese troops there uncharacteristically abandoned their positions and fled inland. There was some opposition as they pressed forward, but by 24 April they had reached the lake and by 26 April secured the two eastern airfields. The two forces linked up the same day.

The collapse of Japanese resistance has been attributed to lack of preparedness, due to changes in the command structure and to a lack of combat troops; many of the 11,000 men based there were administrative and support units. None of the senior officers present had been in post more than a few weeks and the senior air officer had been relieved following the destruction of his air forces at the beginning of April. Neither Kitazono nor Endo had been able to prepare a comprehensive defence plan, and in any event had neither the men nor the resources to carry it out. On the other hand the Allied operation had been over-insured; concerns over the strength of the Japanese garrison had left the Allies with a four to one advantage in the event.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1944
To Year
1944
 
Last Updated:
Jun 2, 2014
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  39 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Alumbaugh, Maurice, PO1, (1942-1953)
  • Ballard, Bland Albert, F1c, (1942-1945)
  • Booth, Robert Douglas, PO2, (1943-1945)
  • Hazelwood, Denna, PO1, (1942-1944)
  • Soucy, Ronald, PO2, (1942-1945)
  • Vizcarra Jr., Oscar, S1c, (1943-1946)
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