Bruton, Henry Chester, RADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Last Primary NEC
112X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Submarine Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1958-1960, US European Command (USEUCOM)
Service Years
1926 - 1960
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Rear Admiral Upper Half

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

75 kb

Home State
Arkansas
Arkansas
Year of Birth
1905
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Michael D. Withers (Mike), OSCS to remember Bruton, Henry Chester, RADM.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Bellville
Last Address
Chevy Chase, Maryland

Date of Passing
Aug 15, 1992
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
United States Naval InstituteSubmarine Veterans of WW IIArmed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA)
  2013, United States Naval Institute [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2013, Submarine Veterans of WW II
  2013, Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA)


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Not Specified
   
Other Comments:
NAVY CROSS

Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lieutenant Commander Henry Chester Bruton (NSN: 0-60171), United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. GREENLING (SS-213), in the successful conduct of an offensive war patrol during the SECOND War Patrol of that vessel from 10 July 1942 until 1 September 1942. In spite of strong enemy counter measures, he coolly and courageously pressed home every favorable attack opportunity and succeeded in sinking a total of 23,950 tons of enemy merchant shipping. During one depth charge attack, depth charges were dropping sufficiently close to jar personnel from their feet and to cause minor damage throughout the ship, but he brought his ship through and his crew home without loss and in splendid offensive spirits. His courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
General Orders: Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet: Serial 24
Action Date: July 10 - September 1, 1942
Service: Navy
Rank: Lieutenant Commander
Company: Commanding Officer
Division: U.S.S. Greenling (SS-213)

NAVY CROSS

Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Lieutenant Commander Henry Chester Bruton (NSN: 0-60171), United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. GREENLING (SS-213). Lieutenant Commander Bruton conducted an aggressive and successful war patrol in enemy controlled waters, during the THIRD War Patrol of that vessel, from 23 September 1942 to 1 November 1942. Undeterred by numerous anti-submarine patrol craft and the severe enemy counter-offensive, Commander Bruton conducted a consistently successful and aggressive War Patrol against a determined and relentless foe. His superb seamanship, skill and inspiring leadership enabled the GREENLING to sink a total of 32,050 tons of enemy shipping and to damage severely one converted aircraft carrier of 22,000 tons. Commander Bruton brought his ship through unscathed and his crew home without loss or injury and with fighting spirit undiminished. His courage and skill were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Naval Service.
General Orders: Commander In Chief Pacific Fleet: Serial 03549 (December 10, 1942)
Action Date: September 23 - November 1, 1942
Service: Navy
Rank: Lieutenant Commander
Company: Commanding Officer
Division: U.S.S. Greenling (SS-213)
   
 Photo Album   (More...



Korean War
Start Year
1950
End Year
1953

Description
The Korean War; 25 June 1950 - 27 July 1953) began when North Korea invaded South Korea. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union gave some assistance.

Korea was ruled by Japan from 1910 until the closing days of World War II. In August 1945, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, as a result of an agreement with the United States, and liberated Korea north of the 38th parallel. U.S. forces subsequently moved into the south. By 1948, as a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea was split into two regions, with separate governments. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither side accepted the border as permanent. The conflict escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces supported by the Soviet Union and China moved into the south on 25 June 1950. On that day, the United Nations Security Council recognized this North Korean act as invasion and called for an immediate ceasefire. On 27 June, the Security Council adopted S/RES/83: Complaint of aggression upon the Republic of Korea and decided the formation and dispatch of the UN Forces in Korea. Twenty-one countries of the United Nations eventually contributed to the UN force, with the United States providing 88% of the UN's military personnel.

After the first two months of the conflict, South Korean forces were on the point of defeat, forced back to the Pusan Perimeter. In September 1950, an amphibious UN counter-offensive was launched at Inchon, and cut off many of the North Korean troops. Those that escaped envelopment and capture were rapidly forced back north all the way to the border with China at the Yalu River, or into the mountainous interior. At this point, in October 1950, Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war. Chinese intervention triggered a retreat of UN forces which continued until mid-1951.

After these reversals of fortune, which saw Seoul change hands four times, the last two years of conflict became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel. The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate. North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign. Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies.

The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed. The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty has been signed, and the two Koreas are technically still at war. Periodic clashes, many of which are deadly, have continued to the present.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1952
To Year
1952
 
Last Updated:
Dec 1, 2013
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  682 Also There at This Battle:
  • Aalto, Tauno Hjalmer, PO2, (1949-1953)
  • Adderton, Manning, SN, (1951-1955)
  • Alexatos, Michael Stephen, CAPT, (1942-1970)
  • Alonzo, Louis, PO3, (1950-1954)
  • Ambellan, Charles Herbert, CAPT, (1942-1970)
  • Amos, Bobby, PO1, (1949-1969)
  • Arechiga, Sr., Raymond
  • Barcus, Riley
  • Bartlett, Davis, PO1, (1951-1972)
  • Bass, Richard Daniel, LTJG, (1951-1953)
  • Beam, Joe, MCPO, (1941-2004)
  • Beckley, Jerry, CWO4, (1948-1969)
  • Beckwith, Eugene Gerrard, PO2, (1951-1955)
  • Bennett, Donald, S1c, (1951-1954)
  • Bick, Raymond, SR, (1949-1953)
  • Bowman, Gerald, FN, (1950-1954)
  • Brown, Jim, PO2, (1952-1955)
  • Brown, Ronald, SCPO, (1943-1968)
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