CASEY, Alvin H., LT

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Lieutenant
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1943-1946, 616X, USS Belleau Wood (CVL-24)
Service Years
1943 - 1946
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Decommissioning
Iwo Jima
Order of the Shellback
Panama Canal
Plank Owner
Lieutenant
Lieutenant

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Oklahoma
Oklahoma
Year of Birth
1915
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Steven Loomis (SaigonShipyard), IC3 to remember CASEY, Alvin H. (Harold), LT.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Stigler in Haskell County, Oklahoma
Last Address
Harold died at Stillwater, Oklahoma.
He was buried alongside his wife at
Gracelawn Cemetery in Edmond, OK.

Date of Passing
Jan 08, 1991
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

WW II Honorable Discharge Pin


 Unofficial Badges 

Order of the Shellback US Army Honorable Discharge US Naval Reserve Honorable Discharge Order of the Golden Dragon






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Lieutenant Alvin "Harold" Casey, WWII
USS BelleauWood, Plank Owner

Alvin Harold Casey, served on the USS Belleau Wood during WW2. Harold was on the carrier for all campaigns during the war. After graduating from Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State University), he entered the service as an Ensign, leaving the service in 1946 after attaining the rank of Lieutenant. He was in charge of the hanger where the bombs were loaded, planes fueled, etc. From April of 1943 to February of 1946, while serving on the UWW Belleau Wood, he was stationed with the Fifth Fleet in Hawaii, Saipan, Phillipines and Japan.
   
Other Comments:

   
 Photo Album   (More...



World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Luzon Campaign (1944-45)
Start Year
1944
End Year
1945

Description
On December 15, 1944, landings against minimal resistance were made on the southern beaches of the island of Mindoro, a key location in the planned Lingayen Gulf operations, in support of major landings scheduled on Luzon. On January 9, 1945, on the south shore of Lingayen Gulf on the western coast of Luzon, General Krueger's Sixth Army landed his first units. Almost 175,000 men followed across the twenty-mile (32 km) beachhead within a few days. With heavy air support, Army units pushed inland, taking Clark Field, 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Manila, in the last week of January.

Two more major landings followed, one to cut off the Bataan Peninsula, and another, that included a parachute drop, south of Manila. Pincers closed on the city and, on February 3, 1945, elements of the U.S. 1st Cavalry Division pushed into the northern outskirts of Manila and the 8th Cavalry Regiment (organized as infantry) passed through the northern suburbs and into the city itself.

As the advance on Manila continued from the north and the south, the Bataan Peninsula was rapidly secured. On February 16, paratroopers and amphibious units simultaneously assaulted the islet of Corregidor. It was necessary to take this stronghold because troops there can block the entrance of Manila Bay. The Americans needed to establish a major harbor base at Manila Bay to support the expected invasion of Japan, planned to begin on November 1, 1945. Resistance on Corregidor ended on February 27, and then all resistance by the Japanese Empire ceased on August 15, 1945, obviating the need for an invasion of the Japanese Home Islands.

Despite initial optimism, fighting in Manila was harsh. It took until March 3 to clear the city of all Japanese troops, and the Japanese Marines, who fought on stubbornly and refused to either surrender or to evacuate as the Japanese Army had done. Fort Drum, a fortified island in Manila Bay near Corregidor, held out until 13 April, when a team of Army troops went ashore and pumped 3,000 gallons of diesel fuel into the fort, then set off incendiary charges. No Japanese soldiers in Fort Drum survived the blast and fire.

In all, ten U.S. divisions and five independent regiments battled on Luzon, making it the largest American campaign of the Pacific war, involving more troops than the United States had used in North Africa, Italy, or southern France.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1944
To Year
1945
 
Last Updated:
Nov 2, 2014
   
Personal Memories

Memories
USS Belleau Wood (CVL-24)
World War II

After a brief shakedown cruise, Belleau Wood reported to the Pacific Fleet, arriving at Pearl Harbor 26 July 1943. After supporting the occupation of Baker Island (1 September) and taking part in the Tarawa (18 September) and Wake Island (5 - 6 October) raids, she joined TF 50 for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands (19 November - 4 December 1943).

A Japanese bomber explodes as it crashes into the sea near USS Belleau Wood, during an attack on Task Group 58.2 off the Mariana Islands, 23 February 1944.

Belleau Wood operated with TF 58 during the seizure of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls, Marshall Islands (29 January - 3 February 1944), Truk raid (16 - 17 February); Saipan-Tinian-Rota-Guam raids (21 - 22 February); Palau-Yap-Ulithi-Woleai raid (30 March - 1 April); Sawar and Wakde Island raids in support of the landings at Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura), New Guinea (22 - 24 April); Truk-Satawan-Ponape raid (29 April - 1 May); occupation of Saipan (11 - 24 June), 1st Bonins raid (15 - 16 June), Battle of the Philippine Sea (19 - 20 June); and 2nd Bonins raid (24 June). During the Battle Of the Philippine Sea, Belleau Wood's planes sank the Japanese carrier Hiyo.

After an overhaul at Pearl Harbor (29 June - 31 July 1944) Belleau Wood rejoined TF 58 for the last stages of the occupation of Guam (2 - 10 August). She joined TF 38 and took part in the strikes in support of the occupation of the southern Palaus (6 September - 14 October); Philippine Islands raids (9 - 24 September); Morotai landings (15 September); Okinawa raid (10 October); northern Luzon and Formosa raids (11 - 14 October); Luzon strikes (15 and 17 October - 19 October), and the Battle of Cape Engano (24 - 26 October). On 30 October, while Belleau Wood was patrolling with her task group east of Leyte, she shot down a Japanese suicide plane which fell on her flight deck aft, causing fires which set off ammunition. Before the fire could be brought under control, 92 men had either died or gone missing.

After temporary repairs at Ulithi (2 - 11 November), Belleau Wood steamed to Hunters Point, California, for permanent repairs and an overhaul, arriving 29 November. She departed San Francisco Bay 20 January 1945 and joined TF 58 at Ulithi on 7 February. During 15 February - 4 March she took part in the raids on Honshū Island, Japan, and the Nansei Shoto, as well as supporting the landings on Iwo Jima. She also took part in the 5th Fleet strikes against Japan (17 March - 26 May) and the 3rd Fleet strikes (27 May - 11 June). After embarking Air Group 31 at Leyte (13 June - 1 July), she rejoined the 3rd Fleet for the final strikes against the Japanese home islands (10 July - 15 August). The last Japanese aircraft shot down in the war was a "Judy" dive bomber which was shot down by Clarence "Bill" A. Moore, an F6F pilot of "The Flying Meat-Axe" VF-31 from USS Belleau Wood.

Belleau Wood launched her planes 2 September for the mass flight over Tokyo, Japan, during the surrender ceremonies. She remained in Japanese waters until 13 October. Arriving at Pearl Harbor 28 October, she departed three days later with 1248 servicemen for San Diego. She remained on "Magic Carpet" duty, returning servicemen from Guam and Saipan to San Diego, until 31 January 1946. During the next year Belleau Wood was moored at various docks in the San Francisco area, undergoing inactivation. She was placed out of commission in reserve at Alameda Naval Air Station 13 January 1947.

Belleau Wood received the Presidential Unit Citation and twelve battle stars during World War II.

Lieutenant Harold Casey was on board during all battles.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  366 Also There at This Battle:
  • Albanesi, Thomas, PO1, (1943-1946)
  • Bagby, Henry Lawton, CAPT, (1941-1970)
  • Block, Charles John, CPO, (1938-1945)
  • Bolmgren, Mary
  • Booth, Robert Douglas, PO2, (1943-1945)
  • Brewster, Donald, PO3, (1943-1946)
  • Campbell, Donald Christenberry, ENS, (1943-1945)
  • Colvin, Victor Morgan, F1c, (1944-1945)
  • Crookshank, Irvin, PO2, (1942-1946)
  • Deschenes, Alfred Joseph, CPO, (1942-1970)
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