Christy, Harley Hannibal, VADM

Deceased
 
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Last Rank
Vice Admiral
Last Primary NEC
111X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Surface Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1923-1924, 00X, USS California (BB-44)
Service Years
1891 - 1934
Vice Admiral
Vice Admiral

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Ohio
Ohio
Year of Birth
1870
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by the Site Administrator to remember Christy, Harley Hannibal, VADM.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Circleville, Ohio
Last Address
Bethesda, Maryland

Date of Passing
Jun 04, 1950
 
Location of Interment
U.S Naval Academy Cemetery - Annapolis, Maryland
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

US Navy Retired 30


 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
US Navy Vice Admiral. Born in Circleville, Ohio, he graduated from the US Naval Academy Annapolis, Maryland, in 1891. He served in a variety of warship and educational assignments and was in command of two small gunboats in 1902 and as Executive Officer on the USS North Carolina in 1910. Promoted Commander in 1915, he was in command of station ships at Annapolis, Maryland, when he was placed in charge of vessels for the Army Transport, at the Naval Academy, (1915-17). In May 1917, he was promoted Captain in command of the Armored Cruiser USS San Diego engaged in important duty of transporting and escorting troops and supplies to European ports. During World War I, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for distinguished service while in command of USS San Diego which was sunk by a German mine on July 19, 1918. After the war, he was stationed at the Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida, where he was station Commander. In 1924, he was promoted Rear Admiral, held several flag commands ashore and afloat, as well as serving at the Naval War College and other Navy boards in Washington D.C. Christy retired from active duty in October 1934, and in January 1950 was advanced to the rank of Vice Admiral on the Retired List in honor of his combat awards. He died at age 79 in Bethesda, Maryland.
   
Other Comments:
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6605381

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-c/h-chrsty.htm
   
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Spanish-American War
From Month/Year
April / 1898
To Month/Year
August / 1898

Description
The Spanish–American War (Spanish: Guerra hispano-estadounidense or Guerra hispano-americana; Filipino: Digmaang Espanyol-Amerikano) was a conflict fought between Spain and the United States in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana harbor in Cuba leading to United States intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.

Revolts had been occurring for some years in Cuba against Spanish rule. The U.S. later backed these revolts upon entering the Spanish–American War. There had been war scares before, as in the Virginius Affair in 1873. In the late 1890s, US public opinion was agitated by anti-Spanish propaganda led by newspaper publishers such as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst which used yellow journalism to call for war. The business community across the United States had just recovered from a deep depression, and feared that a war would reverse the gains. They lobbied vigorously against going to war.

The US Navy battleship Maine was mysteriously sunk in Havana harbor; political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the administration of Republican President William McKinley into a war that he had wished to avoid.[9] Spain promised time and time again that it would reform, but never delivered. The United States sent an ultimatum to Spain demanding that it surrender control of Cuba. First Madrid declared war, and Washington then followed suit.

The main issue was Cuban independence; the ten-week war was fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. US naval power proved decisive, allowing expeditionary forces to disembark in Cuba against a Spanish garrison already facing nationwide Cuban insurgent attacks and further wasted by yellow fever. Numerically superior Cuban, Philippine, and US forces obtained the surrender of Santiago de Cuba and Manila despite the good performance of some Spanish infantry units and fierce fighting for positions such as San Juan Hill. Madrid sued for peace with two obsolete Spanish squadrons sunk in Santiago de Cuba and Manila Bay and a third, more modern fleet recalled home to protect the Spanish coasts.

The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the US which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippine islands. The cession of the Philippines involved payment of $20 million ($575,760,000 today) to Spain by the US to cover infrastructure owned by Spain.

The defeat and collapse of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock to Spain's national psyche, and provoked a thorough philosophical and artistic revaluation of Spanish society known as the Generation of '98.[ The United States gained several island possessions spanning the globe and a rancorous new debate over the wisdom of expansionism. It was one of only five US wars (against a total of eleven sovereign states) to have been formally declared by Congress.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
April / 1898
To Month/Year
August / 1898
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

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