McGillicuddy, Terry, CAPT

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Captain
Last Primary NEC
144X-Engineering Duty Officer - Ship Engineering Specialist
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1966-1968, 111X, Naval Applied Science Laboratory (NASL), Office of Naval Research (ONR)
Service Years
1940 - 1971
Captain
Captain

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

6 kb

Home State
Washington
Washington
Year of Birth
1917
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Shane Laemmel, MR3 to remember McGillicuddy, Terry, CAPT.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Aberdeen, WA
Last Address
Arbuckle, Colusa County, California
95912

Date of Passing
Dec 27, 2009
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
93801953

 Official Badges 

WW II Honorable Discharge Pin US Navy Retired 30


 Unofficial Badges 

Pearl Harbor Memorial Medallion US Navy Honorable Discharge Cold War Medal




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
http://wwwimage.cbsnews.com/images/2006/12/07/image2238250g.jpgView Image
http://www.timemoneyandblood.com/images/PearlHarbor/shipsPearlHarbor/uss-pennsylvania-pearl-harbor.jpg

USS Pennsylvania in drydock at Pearl Harbor

On December 7, 1941, the battleship USS Pennsylvania was in the Navy Yard drydock, with the destroyers USS Cassin and USS Downes just ahead of her. According to the action reports, at about 7:57 explosions were heard on the end of Ford Island and with a second explosion, the realization came that an aerial attack was in progress. The battleships came under attack but the Pennsylvania was out of reach of the torpedo bombers.

General quarters was sounded and the crew proceeded to battle stations, some breaking locks off the ready ammunition boxes when necessary. Shortly after 8:00 she became one of the first ships to commence firing at the Japanese planes as her anti-aircraft guns were put into action.
   
Other Comments:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ef/USS_Pennsylvania_%28BB-38%29_after_turrets.jpg/800px-USS_Pennsylvania_%28BB-38%29_after_turrets.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4d/Navmarine.png/130px-Navmarine.png
Terry's first duty was in PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38), where he was first J.O. in turret two and plotting room officer on 7 December 1941. The flagship of the Pacific Fleet received the SecNav Unit citation and he received a Naval Letter of Commendation.

He participated in bombardments of Attu, Kiska, Makin, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, and Saipan; the ship received the SecNav Unit Citation and he received a Navy Letter of Commendation. For extinguishing an ammunition fire in Turret I lower handling room/magazine (while in the Majuro Atoll), Terry was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for heroism.
   
 Photo Album   (More...



Korean War
Start Year
1950
End Year
1953

Description
The Korean War; 25 June 1950 - 27 July 1953) began when North Korea invaded South Korea. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union gave some assistance.

Korea was ruled by Japan from 1910 until the closing days of World War II. In August 1945, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, as a result of an agreement with the United States, and liberated Korea north of the 38th parallel. U.S. forces subsequently moved into the south. By 1948, as a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea was split into two regions, with separate governments. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither side accepted the border as permanent. The conflict escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces supported by the Soviet Union and China moved into the south on 25 June 1950. On that day, the United Nations Security Council recognized this North Korean act as invasion and called for an immediate ceasefire. On 27 June, the Security Council adopted S/RES/83: Complaint of aggression upon the Republic of Korea and decided the formation and dispatch of the UN Forces in Korea. Twenty-one countries of the United Nations eventually contributed to the UN force, with the United States providing 88% of the UN's military personnel.

After the first two months of the conflict, South Korean forces were on the point of defeat, forced back to the Pusan Perimeter. In September 1950, an amphibious UN counter-offensive was launched at Inchon, and cut off many of the North Korean troops. Those that escaped envelopment and capture were rapidly forced back north all the way to the border with China at the Yalu River, or into the mountainous interior. At this point, in October 1950, Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war. Chinese intervention triggered a retreat of UN forces which continued until mid-1951.

After these reversals of fortune, which saw Seoul change hands four times, the last two years of conflict became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel. The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate. North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign. Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies.

The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed. The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty has been signed, and the two Koreas are technically still at war. Periodic clashes, many of which are deadly, have continued to the present.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1951
To Year
1953
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories

People You Remember
Commanding Officer:
CDR Terry Thomas McGillicuddy
Dec 16 1951 - Mar 21 1953


Memories
Taking command of USS MANSFIELD (DD-728) at sea in 1951, he spent two winters blockading the East Coast of Korea. He received a second Letter of Commendation for his Korean efforts, which included supporting a successful Canadian Commando raid in Wonsan.

The Blockade of Wonsan, or the Siege of Wonsan, from February 16, 1951 to July 27, 1953, during the Korean War, was the longest naval blockade in modern history, lasting 861 days. UN naval forces, primarily from the United States, successfully kept the strategically important city of Wonsan from being used by the North Korean Navy.

The blockade also served to divert communist troops from the front line. North Korean resistance used artillery to oppose the American fleet, although this was mostly ineffective, and the city was heavily damaged by UN naval aircraft and warships.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
Blockade of Wonsan

  832 Also There at This Battle:
  • Aalto, Tauno Hjalmer, PO2, (1949-1953)
  • Adderton, Manning, SN, (1951-1955)
  • Alexatos, Michael Stephen, CAPT, (1942-1970)
  • Allen, Richard, PO3, (1951-1954)
  • Alonzo, Louis, PO3, (1950-1954)
  • Ambellan, Charles Herbert, CAPT, (1942-1970)
  • Amos, Bobby, PO1, (1949-1969)
  • Apple, Clarence, PO2, (1948-2010)
  • Arechiga, Sr., Raymond
  • Baker, Raymond C., PO3, (1948-1951)
  • Barcus, Riley
  • Bartlett, Davis, PO1, (1951-1972)
  • Bass, Richard Daniel, LTJG, (1951-1953)
  • Beam, Joe, MCPO, (1941-2004)
  • Beckley, Jerry, CWO4, (1948-1969)
  • Beckwith, Eugene Gerrard, PO2, (1951-1955)
  • Bennett, Donald, SN, (1951-1954)
  • Bick, Raymond, SR, (1949-1953)
  • Bick, Robert Sterling, LTJG, (1951-1953)
  • Blumenthal, Jerry, PO3, (1951-1955)
  • Bowman, Gerald, FN, (1950-1954)
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