DAVIS, Glenn, Sr., VADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Vice Admiral
Last Primary NEC
111X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Surface Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1952-1953, 6th Naval District
Service Years
1913 - 1953
Vice Admiral
Vice Admiral

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

621 kb

Home State
Ohio
Ohio
Year of Birth
1892
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Steven Loomis (SaigonShipyard), IC3 to remember DAVIS, Glenn, Sr., VADM.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Norwalk, Huron County, Ohio
Last Address
Died: Hilton Head Island
Beaufort County, South Carolina

Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington, Virginia
Plot: Section 2 Site 1148-2

Date of Passing
Sep 09, 1984
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

US Navy Retired 30


 Unofficial Badges 

US Navy Honorable Discharge




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Glenn Benson Davis, Sr.
Vice Admiral, United States Navy

Glenn Benson Davis, Sr., 92, a retired United States Navy Vice Admiral who was a highly decorated combat veteran of WWII, died of a heart attack September 9, 1984 at Hilton Head Hospital on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. He had lived in Wash, DC, until moving in July to a retirement community in Hilton Head. 

Vice Admiral Davis, a 1913 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, served aboard the U.S.S. KANSAS during the occupation of Vera Cruz, Mexico (1914). During World War I he served aboard the tanker MAUMEE and subsequently saw duty aboard a variety of battleships, destroyers and cruisers. He was aboard the PHILADELPHIA (1937-1939) at the time of President Franklin Roosevelt's cruise and then was assigned as chief of the Bureau of Ordnance. During World War II he commanded the battleship U.S.S. WASHINGTON in the South Pacific and became commander of Battleship Division Eight.  His World War II medals included 2 Legions of Merit and the Navy Cross. 

When the US entered WWII, Admiral Davis was Assistant Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance. In July 1942, he took command of the new battleship Washington and sailed her in harm's way at Guadalcanal. The Washington was flagship of Task Force 64 and leading a supply operation when it became engaged in the bitter fight off Savo Island on the night of November 14-15, 1942. 

For his actions in the battle, Admiral Davis was awarded the Navy Cross. The award's citation reads in part: "Boldly fighting against numerically superior forces, he skillfully maneuvered his ship unscathed through perilous waters despite the hazards of enemy gunfire and repeated hostile torpedo attacks. His superior leadership in the face of grave danger inspired his men to direct rapid and accurate gunfire against the Japanese ships, thereby sinking one hostile vessel outright and contributing materially to the destruction of other enemy ships." 

In April 1943, he was named commander of Battleship Division 8. He was awarded two Legion of Merit medals for leading the division against the enemy at Truk, and during carrier raids on Saipan, Tinian, and Guam, and in other legendary battles of the Pacific war. He returned to the mainland in March 1945. 

His postwar assignments included tours as superintendent of the USN Gun Factory in Washington, DC, and commandant of the Potomac River USN Command. His last assignment was as commandant of the 6th USN District in Charleston, South Carolina. He ret from active duty in 1953 and advanced to the rank of Vice Admiral on the basis of his combat awards. After that, he became an executive in the shipping industry, including president of the Isthmian Steamship Co and board chairman of Isthmian Lines Inc, before retiring a second time in 1958. 

Admiral Davis was born in Norwalk, Ohio. In 1913, he graduated 9th in a class of 140 from the United States Naval Academy. 

He served in the Atlantic during WWI. Between the Wars, he studied ordnance engineering at the USN Postgraduate School at Annapolis and chemical warfare at Edgewood Arsenal. He also commanded a destroyer and was executive officer of the light cruiser Philadelphia. 

Glenn B. Davis, Sr., 1892-1984. He was buried in Section 2 of Arlington National Cemetery.
   
Other Comments:
 
NAVY CROSS
Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Rear Admiral [then Captain] Glenn Benson Davis, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the Battleship U.S.S. WASHINGTON (BB-56), during an engagement with Japanese naval forces near Savo Island on the night of 14 - 15 November 1942. Rear Admiral Davis skillfully maneuvered his ship through perilous waters and repeated torpedo attacks against numerically superior Japanese forces. Gunfire from his ship is credited with sinking one enemy ship and damaging others. His own ship came through the engagement undamaged. His conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Navy of the United States.

General Orders: Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 320 (November 1943)
Action Date: November 14 - 15, 1942
Service: Navy 
Rank: Rear Admiral
Company: Commanding Officer
Division: U.S.S. Washington (BB-56)
   
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Mariana and Palau Islands Campaign (1944)/Battle of Guam
Start Year
1944
End Year
1944

Description
Guam, ringed by reefs, cliffs, and heavy surf, presents a formidable challenge for an attacker. But despite the obstacles, on 21 July, the Americans landed on both sides of the Orote peninsula on the western side of Guam, planning to cut off the airfield. The 3rd Marine Division landed near Agana to the north of Orote at 08:28, and the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade landed near Agat to the south. Japanese artillery sank 20 LVTs, and inflicted heavy casualties on the Americans, especially on the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, but by 09:00 men and tanks were ashore at both beaches. The 77th Infantry Division had a more difficult landing. Lacking amphibious vehicles, they had to wade ashore from the edge of the reef where they were dropped by their landing craft. The men stationed in the two beachheads were pinned down by heavy Japanese fire, making initial progress inland quite slow.



US Marines move inland.
By nightfall, the Americans had established beachheads about 6,600 feet (2,000 m) deep. Japanese counterattacks were made throughout the first few days of the battle, mostly at night, using infiltration tactics. Several times, they penetrated the American defenses and were driven back with heavy loss of men and equipment. Lieutenant General Takeshi Takashina was killed on 28 July, and Lieutenant General Hideyoshi Obata took over the command of the defenders.

Supply was very difficult for the Americans in the first days of the battle. Landing ships could not come closer than the reef, several hundred yards from the beach, and amphibious vehicles were scarce. However, the two beachheads were joined up on 25 July, and the Orote airfield and Apra harbor were captured by 30 July.

The counterattacks against the American beachheads, as well as the fierce fighting, had exhausted the Japanese. At the start of August, they were running out of food and ammunition and had only a handful of tanks left. Obata withdrew his troops from the south of Guam, planning to make a stand in the mountainous central and northern part of the island. But with resupply and reinforcement impossible because of American control of the sea and air around Guam, he could hope to do no more than delay the inevitable defeat for a few days.

Rain and thick jungle made conditions difficult for the Americans, but after an engagement at Mount Barrigada from 2-4 August, the Japanese line collapsed; the rest of the battle was a pursuit to the north. As in other battles of the Pacific War, the Japanese refused to surrender, and almost all were killed. On 10 August, after three weeks of combat, organized Japanese resistance ended, and Guam was declared secure. The next day, Obata committed ritual suicide.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1944
To Year
1944
 
Last Updated:
Oct 29, 2011
   
Personal Memories

Memories
In April 1943, he was named commander of Battleship Division 8. He was awarded two Legion of Merit medals for leading the division against the enemy at Truk, and during carrier raids on Saipan, Tinian, and Guam, and in other legendary battles of the Pacific war. He returned to the mainland in March 1945.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  191 Also There at This Battle:
  • Barr, John Andrew, PO3, (1943-1946)
  • Besson, John Henry, RADM, (1931-1959)
  • Chavez, Natalio, S1c, (1944-1946)
  • Crookshank, Irvin, PO2, (1942-1946)
  • Dawson, William L., PO2, (1942-1945)
  • Dikel, Samuel, PO2, (1942-1946)
  • Garrett, Earl, PO2, (1941-1953)
  • Garrettson, Charles
  • Hazelwood, Denna, PO1, (1942-1944)
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