EBERT, Walter, RADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1950-1950, US Naval Academy Annapolis (Faculty Staff)
Service Years
1930 - 1950
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Rear Admiral Upper Half

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

452 kb

Home State
West Virginia
West Virginia
Year of Birth
1909
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Steven Loomis (SaigonShipyard), IC3 to remember EBERT, Walter (Wally), RADM.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Parkersburg, West Virginia
Last Address
He passed away in Lakeland, Florida, USA.

Date of Passing
Jun 20, 1990
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Plot: Columbarium 1

 Official Badges 

US Navy Retired 20


 Unofficial Badges 

US Navy Honorable Discharge


 Military Association Memberships
United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. (USSVI)
  1963, United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. (USSVI) [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity



Rear Admiral Walter G. Ebert, U.S.N. (Ret)

Navy Cross, Silver Star (2), Legion of Merit, Bronze Star


In 1926, at age 16, Walter Gale Ebert entered the United States Naval Academy and began a 24 year career. Ebert served primarily in submarine warfare, including commanding submarine SCAMP in the Pacific during World War II. After the war, he returned to Annapolis to head the academic program at the Naval Academy.  

War time rank:  Lieutenant 2 June 1938,  Lieutenant Commander (T) 15 June 1942, Commander (T) 15 October 1942, Captain (T) 15 November 1945. He retired as a U.S. Navy Rear Admiral in 1950.

After retiring, the Admiral became the Hospital Administrator for Ball Memorial in Muncie, Indiana, and held that position from 1952 until 1972. 

Submarine USS Scamp (277)
Commanded by W.G. Ebert (January 1943 to February 1944) and sunk no less than 5 Japanese ships totaling more than 34,000 tons.

19 Jan 1943
With her trials and initial training completed USS Scamp (Cdr. Walter G. Ebert) departs New London bound for the Pacific

13 Feb 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) arrives at Pearl Harbor.

1 Mar 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) departs Pearl Harbor for her 1st war patrol. She is ordered to patrol off Honshu in Japanese home waters.

5 Mar 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) toppes off with fuel at Midway.

20 Mar 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and damages the Japanese merchant cargo ship Seinan Maru (1450 GRT) off Tomari, Honshu, Japan in position 41º06'N, 141º26'E.

21 Mar 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and damages the Japanese troop transport Manju Maru (6541 GRT) off the east coast of Honshu, Japan in position 41º45'N, 142º14'E.

7 Apr 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) ends her 1st war patrol at Pearl Harbor.

19 Apr 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) departs Pearl Harbor for her 2nd war patrol. She is ordered to patrol off the Bismarck Archipelago.

28 May 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and sinks the Japanese seaplane carrier Kamikawa Maru (6853 GRT) north of Kavieng, New Ireland in position 01º36'S, 150º24'E.

4 Jun 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) ends her 2nd war patrol at Brisbane, Australia.

22 Jun 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) departs Brisbane for her 3rd war patrol. She is ordered to patrol off the Bismarck Archipelago

27 Jul 1943
While patrolling off New Ireland USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and damages the Japanese fleet oiler Kazahaya (18300 GRT) in position 02º38'S, 149º20'E and torpedoes and sinks the Japanese submarine I-168 (1400 tons) in position 02º50'S, 149º01'E.

6 Aug 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) ends her 3rd war patrol at Brisbane.

2 Sep 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) departs Brisbane for her 4th war patrol. Once again she is to patrol off the Bismarck Archipelago.

18 Sep 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and damages the Japanese army cargo ship Kansai Maru (8614 GRT) north of New Guinea in position 00º41'N, 146º28'E. Scamp is damaged by depth charges from the escorts but is able to remain on patrol.

19 Sep 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and sinks the Japanese army cargo ship Kansai Maru (8614 BRT) north of New Guinea in position 00º25'N, 146º21'E.

1 Oct 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) ends her 4th war patrol at Brisbane.

22 Oct 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) departs Brisbane for her 5th war patrol. She is ordered to patrol between Kavieng and Truk.

10 Nov 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and damages the Japanese troop transport Tokyo Maru (6481 GRT) between Truk and Kavieng in position 03º30'N, 150º10'E. The damaged Japanese ship is taken in tow by the Mitakesan Maru but the Tokyo Maru sinks on 12 November 1943 in position 05º42'N, 151º09'E.

12 Nov 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and damages the Japanese light cruiser Agano north of the Bismarck Archipelago in position 01º03'N, 149º15'E.

26 Nov 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) ends her 5h war patrol at Brisbane.

16 Dec 1943
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) departs Brisbane for her 6th war patrol. She is ordered to patrol off the Bismarck Archipelago.

14 Jan 1944
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) torpedoes and sinks the Japanese fleet tanker Nippon Maru (10024 GRT) south of Sorol Island in position 05º02'N, 140º50'E.

6 Feb 1944
USS Scamp (Cdr. W.G. Ebert) ends her 6th war patrol at Milne Bay, New Guinea.

   
Other Comments:

Rear Admiral Ebert moved to Marietta, Ohio after retirement to become administrator of the local hospital. He was there two years when he was chosen to succeed Nellie Brown as administrator of Ball Memorial Hospital of Muncie Indiana. High on the list of responsibilities for the new administrator was the ability to organize, fund and build an expansion of the hospital. During Ebert's tenure as administrator the hospital grew from 240 beds to 562, two major additions were completed, the School of Nursing was phased out and Ball State University's baccalaureate nursing course was begun, a school of practical nursing was established, the critical care unit was started and full-time emergency room physicians were added.

After 20 years as administrator, Ebert retired in 1972.

   
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Northern Solomon Islands Campaign (1943-44)/Battle of Bismarck Sea
Start Year
1943
End Year
1943

Description
The Battle of the Bismarck Sea (2–4 March 1943) took place in the South West Pacific Area (SWPA) during World War II when aircraft of the U.S. Fifth Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) attacked a Japanese convoy carrying troops to Lae, New Guinea. Most of the task force was destroyed, and Japanese troop losses were heavy.

The Japanese convoy was a result of a Japanese Imperial General Headquarters decision in December 1942 to reinforce their position in the South West Pacific. A plan was devised to move some 6,900 troops from Rabaul directly to Lae. The plan was understood to be risky, because Allied air power in the area was strong, but it was decided to proceed because otherwise the troops would have to be landed a considerable distance away and march through inhospitable swamp, mountain and jungle terrain without roads before reaching their destination. On 28 February 1943, the convoy – comprising eight destroyers and eight troop transports with an escort of approximately 100 fighters – set out from Simpson Harbour in Rabaul.

The Allies had detected preparations for the convoy, and naval codebreakers in Melbourne (FRUMEL) and Washington, D.C., had decrypted and translated messages indicating the convoy’s intended destination and date of arrival. The Allied Air Forces had developed new techniques they hoped would improve the chances of successful air attack on ships. They detected and shadowed the convoy, which came under sustained air attack on 2–3 March 1943. Follow-up attacks by PT boats and aircraft were made on 4 March. All eight transports and four of the escorting destroyers were sunk. Out of 6,900 troops who were badly needed in New Guinea, only about 1,200 made it to Lae. Another 2,700 were rescued by destroyers and submarines and returned to Rabaul. The Japanese made no further attempts to reinforce Lae by ship, greatly hindering their ultimately unsuccessful efforts to stop Allied offensives in New Guinea.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1943
To Year
1943
 
Last Updated:
Apr 23, 2011
   
Personal Memories

Memories
The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Commander Walter Gale Ebert (NSN: 0-63429), United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. SCAMP (SS-277), on the FOURTH War Patrol of that submarine during the period 2 September 1943 to 1 October 1943, in enemy controlled waters of the Bismarck Sea. Commander Ebert skillfully and daringly maneuvered his ship into positions from which to strike the enemy, and repeatedly attacked, sinking two valuable Japanese ships totaling 15,100 tons, and probably sinking an anti-submarine vessel of 500 tons. Undeterred by strong and determined enemy counter measures including depth charges and gunfire, and with his ship at one time in extreme danger of sinking, he courageously and relentlessly pressed home attacks against the enemy at every opportunity, and returned his ship safely to her base. His conduct during this patrol was a continuation of his illustrious record, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  5 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Paggi, Willard, SN, (1942-1945)
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