Carpender, Arthur Schuyler, ADM

Deceased
 
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Last Rank
Admiral
Last Primary NEC
112X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Submarine Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1946-1946, 112X, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV)/Executive Office Secretary of the Navy (EXOS)
Service Years
1908 - 1946
Admiral
Admiral

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

90 kb

Home State
New Jersey
New Jersey
Year of Birth
1884
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Michael D. Withers (Mike), OSCS to remember Carpender, Arthur Schuyler ("Chips"), ADM.

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Contact Info
Home Town
New Brunswick, NJ
Last Address
Georgetown, MD

Date of Passing
Jan 10, 1960
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

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Last Known Activity
Arthur Schuyler Carpender (October 24, 1884-1960) was an American Vice Admiral during World War II commanding U.S. naval forces in the Southwest Pacific.

A direct descendant of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven, was born to John Neilson Carpender and Anna Neilson Kemp on October 24, 1884.

Entering the United States Navy in the late 1890s, Carpender would eventually commanding the Destroyers Atlantic Fleet from December 1941 to June 1942, Carpender was assigned to General Douglas MacArthur's Southwest Pacific Force on September 11, 1942 succeeding former deputy Admiral Leary. Although disagreeing on the deployment of the small naval force, particularly on sending Allied destroyers and submarines to support Australian forces near Buna during the Lilliput Plan, Carpender worked with McArthur to combat the severe supply shortages hindering "MacArthur's Navy" (later reorganized as the U.S. 7th Fleet on February 19, 1943).

Observing the capabilities of PT boats during his evacuation from the Philippines, MacArthur encouraged their use as Carpender effectively made use of the torpedo boats during the Battle of the Bismarck Sea on March 25, 1943. Along with Rear Admiral Daniel E. Barbey, Carpender would oversee the fleet's operations during Operation Cartwheel.

Replaced by Admiral Thomas C. Kincaid on November 26, Carpender would later command the Ninth Naval District from January 3, 1944 until September 2, 1945, during which time the construction of the USS Macabi (SS-375) would be sponsored by Carpender's wife, before his retirement in 1946. Carpender would continue to live in retirement with his wife Helena until his death in the Georgetown area of Washington, DC on 10 Jan 1960.

   
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Northern Solomon Islands Campaign (1943-44)/Battle of Bismarck Sea
Start Year
1943
End Year
1943

Description
The Battle of the Bismarck Sea (2–4 March 1943) took place in the South West Pacific Area (SWPA) during World War II when aircraft of the U.S. Fifth Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) attacked a Japanese convoy carrying troops to Lae, New Guinea. Most of the task force was destroyed, and Japanese troop losses were heavy.

The Japanese convoy was a result of a Japanese Imperial General Headquarters decision in December 1942 to reinforce their position in the South West Pacific. A plan was devised to move some 6,900 troops from Rabaul directly to Lae. The plan was understood to be risky, because Allied air power in the area was strong, but it was decided to proceed because otherwise the troops would have to be landed a considerable distance away and march through inhospitable swamp, mountain and jungle terrain without roads before reaching their destination. On 28 February 1943, the convoy – comprising eight destroyers and eight troop transports with an escort of approximately 100 fighters – set out from Simpson Harbour in Rabaul.

The Allies had detected preparations for the convoy, and naval codebreakers in Melbourne (FRUMEL) and Washington, D.C., had decrypted and translated messages indicating the convoy’s intended destination and date of arrival. The Allied Air Forces had developed new techniques they hoped would improve the chances of successful air attack on ships. They detected and shadowed the convoy, which came under sustained air attack on 2–3 March 1943. Follow-up attacks by PT boats and aircraft were made on 4 March. All eight transports and four of the escorting destroyers were sunk. Out of 6,900 troops who were badly needed in New Guinea, only about 1,200 made it to Lae. Another 2,700 were rescued by destroyers and submarines and returned to Rabaul. The Japanese made no further attempts to reinforce Lae by ship, greatly hindering their ultimately unsuccessful efforts to stop Allied offensives in New Guinea.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1943
To Year
1943
 
Last Updated:
Nov 21, 2010
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  5 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Paggi, Willard, SN, (1942-1945)
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