Adair, Charles L., RADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
33 kb
View Time Line
Last Rank
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Last Primary NEC
111X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Surface Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1955-1956, 111X, Under Secretary of the Navy (UNSECNAV)/Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management & Comptroller) ASN (FM&C)
Service Years
1926 - 1956
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Cold War
Order of the Golden Dragon
Iwo Jima
Neptune Subpoena
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Rear Admiral Upper Half

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

15 kb

Home State
Texas
Texas
Year of Birth
1902
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Bersley H Thomas, Jr. (Tom), SMCS to remember Adair, Charles L. (Ret.), RADM USN(Ret).

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Tyler
Last Address
Annapolis, Maryland

Date of Passing
Jul 02, 1993
 
Location of Interment
U.S. Naval Academy Cemetery - Annapolis, Maryland
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

US Navy Retired 30


 Unofficial Badges 

Order of the Shellback Order of the Golden Dragon Command & Control Excellence Award


 Military Association Memberships
United States Naval Academy Alumni AssociationNaval Postgraduate School FoundationNaval Postgraduate School Alumni AssociationMilitary Order of Foreign Wars of the United States
Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW)Association of Naval Services Officers (ANSO)American Society of Military Comptrollers
  1926, United States Naval Academy Alumni Association [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1935, Naval Postgraduate School Foundation
  1935, Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association [Verified]
  1941, Military Order of Foreign Wars of the United States [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1945, Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW)
  1945, Amphibious Forces Veterans Association, US Navy [Verified]
  1956, Association of Naval Services Officers (ANSO)
  1956, American Society of Military Comptrollers [Verified] - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

         Adair, Charles (1902-1993)
Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy (Retired)

Admiral Adair graduated from the Naval Academy in the class of 1926. Following assignments on board the Mississippi, Toucey, Blakeley, and Patoka, he studied communications at the Naval Postgraduate School. From 1935 to 1938 he served as radio officer on the staffs of Destroyer Squadrons Six and 14. After a staff assignment at the Naval Academy, he reported as flag lieutenant to Admiral Thomas Hart, Commander in Chief Asiatic Fleet, and was in that job when World War II broke out. He moved to Corregidor and then escaped to the Dutch East Indies as senior man on board the schooner Lanikai, sailing by night and hiding by day. From 1943 to 1945 he took part in the planning and execution of every major amphibious operation in the Southwest Pacific Area while serving on the staff of Rear Admiral Daniel Barbey, Commander Seventh Amphibious Force. After duty in OpNav and BuPers, he commanded attack cargo ship Marquette, served on the CinCPacFlt staff, and then in the office of the Comptroller of the Navy, William Franke. He retired in 1956.

RADM Adair had lived in Annapolis since 1974.  He died of pneumonia on July 2, 1993 at the Anne Arundel Medical Center. He had Alzheimer's disease.

 

   
Other Comments:
To view award citations, click on the ribbons in the Ribbon Bar box.
   
 Photo Album   (More...



World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/New Georgia Group Operation
Start Year
1943
End Year
1943

Description
This operation was fought during the Pacific war on this group of islands situated in the central Solomons. US forces invaded them as part of an American offensive (CARTWHEEL) to isolate and neutralize Rabaul, the main Japanese base in their South-East Area.

On 20 June 1943 a Raider battalion (, 5(f)) landed at Segi Point on the main island, New Georgia, and during the next two weeks there were other landings by US Marines and 43rd US Division on Rendova and Vangunu islands, and on western New Georgia, to seize a Japanese airstrip at Munda point. Despite the US Navy's intervention, which resulted in the battles of Kula Gulf and Kolombangara, 4,000 reinforcements were successfully dispatched to the commander of the 10,500-strong Japanese garrison, Maj-General Sasaki Noboru. Most reinforced Munda, which became the focus of Japanese resistance, and their night infiltration tactics unnerved the inexperienced US troops. Non-battle casualties, caused by exhaustion and ‘war neuroses’, increased alarmingly, and when the commander of 14th Corps, Maj-General Oscar Griswold, arrived on 11 July he reported the division was ‘about to fold up’. The 37th US Division was brought in, Griswold replaced the worst affected units, and he then launched a corps attack on 25 July. Fierce fighting followed but by 1August the Japanese, outnumbered and outgunned, had withdrawn inland. This time US Navy destroyers prevented more reinforcements reaching them when, on the night of 6/7August, they sank three Japanese transports (battle of Vella Gulf).

Munda now became the base of Marine Corps squadrons which supported landings on Vella Lavella on 15 August. These bypassed and isolated Sasaki's garrison now gathering on Kolombangara after further US reinforcements, elements of 25th US Division, had failed to destroy them on New Georgia. On 15 September Sasaki was ordered to withdraw. In a brilliantly organized evacuation 9,400 men out of the 12,500 on Kolombangara were rescued by landing craft, and the following month those on Vella Lavella were also evacuated.

The campaign proved costly for the Americans who had 1,094 killed and 3,873 wounded with thousands more becoming non-battle casualties. Excluding the fighting on Vella Lavella, 2,483 Japanese bodies were counted. Planned as a one-division operation, the Japanese garrison's ‘skill, tenacity, and valor’—to quote the campaign's official US historian—eventually made it one where elements of four had to be used. ‘The obstinate General Sasaki,’ the same historian concludes, ‘deserved his country's gratitude for his gallant and able conduct.’
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1943
To Year
1943
 
Last Updated:
Nov 1, 2014
   
Personal Memories

Memories
From 1943 to 1945 he took part in the planning and execution of every major amphibious operation in the Southwest Pacific Area while serving on the staff of Rear Admiral Daniel Barbey, Commander Seventh Amphibious Force.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  92 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Brosnan, Ryan
  • Garrett, Earl, PO2, (1941-1953)
  • Ludemann, Herbert, PO2, (1942-1946)
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011