NANCE, James, Jr., RADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
126 kb
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Last Rank
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1977-1979, CNO - OPNAV/Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO)
Service Years
1940 - 1979
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Rear Admiral Upper Half

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

392 kb

Home State
North Carolina
North Carolina
Year of Birth
1921
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Steven Loomis (SaigonShipyard), IC3 to remember NANCE, James, Jr. ('Bud' / DSM), RADM.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Monroe, North Carolina
Last Address
BURIED AT: SECTION 4 SITE 3091 LH
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

Date of Passing
May 11, 1999
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Presidential Service Badge US Navy Retired 30


 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

JAMES WILSON “BUD” NANCE, Jr.
REAR ADMIRAL, U.S. NAVY

WWII • KOREA • VIET-NAM

Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, January 1981 — January 1982.


James Wilson “Bud” Nance Jr., son of Colonel James W. Nance and Mary Elizabeth Monroe, was born in Monroe, North Carolina, where he and Jesse Helms grew up two blocks from each other. He attended what is now North Carolina State University and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1944. Nance also has a master’s degree in international relations from George Washington University.

During World War II, Nance was assigned to the battleship USS North Carolina. After the war, he completed flight training and served as a flight instructor at the Naval Air Basic Training Command of at the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida. He was assigned to exchange duty with the British Royal Navy in 1953 and when he returned to the US in 1955, he was project pilot with the Flight Test Division at the Naval Air Test Center (Patuxent River, MD).

Nance served as the senior naval officer on the staff of the commander of US forces in Europe when Alexander Haig held the combined job of US and NATO commander. He also held strategic and planning posts in the Pentagon and was commander of the aircraft carrier USS Forrestal.  He attained the rank of Rear Admiral on September 1, 1970. His final tour of duty in the Navy was as Assistant Vice-Chief of Naval Operations.

During the SALT II deliberations, Nance served as a consultant to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. In 1981, he joined the White House as President Reagan’s deputy assistant for national security affairs, and for a brief time, he was acting chief special assistant for national security affairs, temporarily replacing Richard V. Allen.  In 1982 he served as director of the Private Sector Survey on Cost Control in the Federal Government.

After leaving the White House, Admiral Nance worked for Boeing Military Airplane Co., where he was manager of Navy systems. In 1991, Admiral Nance was asked by his childhood friend, Jesse Helms, to join the Senate Foreign Relations Committee as staff director to help improve the staff’s efficiency. He served in this position until his death on May 11, 1999. Admiral Nance died from complications of myelodysplasia, a preliminary form of leukemia at the age of 77.

   
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World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Iwo Jima Operation
Start Year
1945
End Year
1945

Description
The Battle of Iwo Jima (19 February – 26 March 1945), or Operation Detachment, was a major battle in which the United States Armed Forces fought for and captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Japanese Empire. The American invasion had the goal of capturing the entire island, including its three airfields (including South Field and Central Field), to provide a staging area for attacks on the Japanese main islands. This five-week battle comprised some of the fiercest and bloodiest fighting of the War in the Pacific of World War II.

After the heavy losses incurred in the battle, the strategic value of the island became controversial. It was useless to the U.S. Army as a staging base and useless to the U.S. Navy as a fleet base. However, Navy SEABEES rebuilt the landing strips, which were used as emergency landing strips for USAAF B-29s. 

The Imperial Japanese Army positions on the island were heavily fortified, with a dense network of bunkers, hidden artillery positions, and 18 km (11 mi) of underground tunnels. The Americans on the ground were supported by extensive naval artillery and complete air supremacy over Iwo Jima from the beginning of the battle by U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aviators.

Iwo Jima was the only battle by the U.S. Marine Corps in which the Japanese combat deaths were thrice those of the Americans throughout the battle. Of the 22,000 Japanese soldiers on Iwo Jima at the beginning of the battle, only 216 were taken prisoner, some of whom were captured because they had been knocked unconscious or otherwise disabled. The majority of the remainder were killed in action, although it has been estimated that as many as 3,000 continued to resist within the various cave systems for many days afterwards, eventually succumbing to their injuries or surrendering weeks later.

Despite the bloody fighting and severe casualties on both sides, the Japanese defeat was assured from the start. Overwhelming American superiority in arms and numbers as well as complete control of air power — coupled with the impossibility of Japanese retreat or reinforcement — permitted no plausible circumstance in which the Americans could have lost the battle.

The battle was immortalized by Joe Rosenthal's photograph of the raising of the U.S. flag on top of the 166 m (545 ft) Mount Suribachi by five U.S. Marines and one U.S. Navy battlefield Hospital Corpsman. The photograph records the second flag-raising on the mountain, both of which took place on the fifth day of the 35-day battle. Rosenthal's photograph promptly became an indelible icon — of that battle, of that war in the Pacific, and of the Marine Corps itself — and has been widely reproduced.
 
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1945
To Year
1945
 
Last Updated:
Aug 14, 2010
   
Personal Memories
   
Units Participated in Operation

VF-46 Men-O-War

USS Bismarck Sea (CVE-95)

 
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  337 Also There at This Battle:
  • Alseike, Leslie, PO3, (1944-1946)
  • Arenberg, Julius (Ted), LTJG, (1943-1946)
  • Bagby, Henry Lawton, CAPT, (1941-1970)
  • Baker, Cecil, Cox, (1941-1946)
  • Barr, John Andrew, PO3, (1943-1946)
  • Baylor, Warner, LCDR, (1942-1963)
  • Bergin, Patrick
  • Block, Charles John, CPO, (1938-1945)
  • Brewster, Donald, PO3, (1943-1946)
  • Carter, Loyd, PO3, (1941-1945)
  • Crookshank, Irvin, PO2, (1942-1946)
  • Crowell, Marshall Medford, F1c, (1943-1945)
  • Daiute, Carroll Paul, PO1, (1942-1945)
  • Dawson, William L., PO2, (1942-1945)
  • DeGeus, Robert, PO3, (1943-1946)
  • Deschenes, Roland Clarence, S1c, (1944-1946)
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