Couillard, Benjamin, AD3

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
32 kb
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Last Rank
Petty Officer Third Class
Last Primary NEC
AD-0000-Aviation Machinist's Mate
Last Rating/NEC Group
Aviation Machinist's Mate
Primary Unit
1945-1946, AD-0000, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)/Naval Air Technical Services Facility (NATSF)
Service Years
1943 - 1946
Voice Edition
AD-Aviation Machinist's Mate

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

440 kb

Home State
Mississippi
Mississippi
Year of Birth
1927
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Diane Short (TWS Chief Admin), SA to remember Couillard, Benjamin (Couillard), AD3.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
3205 Montview Dr.
Chattanooga,TN

Date of Passing
Apr 15, 2017
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

WW II Honorable Discharge Pin


 Unofficial Badges 

Order of the Shellback US Navy Honorable Discharge


 Military Association Memberships
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW)WW II Memorial National RegistryUSS Yorktown CV-10 Association
  1985, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2000, WW II Memorial National Registry [Verified]
  2016, USS Yorktown CV-10 Association [Verified]


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Retired! Was a CRNA for 38 years. I enjoy keeping in touch with my shipmates (the ones that are left!) , They are the greatest guys in the world!

   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Countries Deployed To or Visited

PO3 Benjamin Coulliard 1943-1946

Svalbard Spain United States of America Antarctica South Georgia Falkland Islands Bolivia Peru Ecuador Colombia Venezuela Guyana Suriname French Guiana Brazil Paraguay Uruguay Argentina Chile Greenland Canada United States of America United States of America Israel Jordan Cyprus Qatar United Arab Emirates Oman Yemen Saudia Arabia Iraq Afghanistan Turkmenistan Iran Syria Singapore China Mongolia Papua New Guinea Brunei Indonesia Malaysia Malaysia Tiawan Philippines Vietnam Cambodia Laos Thailand Burma Bangladesh Sri Lanka India Bhutan Nepal Pakistan Afghanistan Turkmenistan Tajikistan Kyrgyzstan Uzbekistan Japan North Korea South Korea Russia Kazakhstan Russia Montenegro Portugal Azerbaijan Armenia Georgia Ukraine Moldova Belarus Romania Bulgaria Macedonia Serbia Bosonia & Herzegovina Turkey Greece Albania Croatia Hungary Slovakia Slovenia Malta Spain Portugal Spain France Italy Italy Austria Switzerland Belgium France Ireland United Kingdom Norway Sweden Finland Estonia Latvia Lithuania Russia Poland Czech Republic Germany Denmark The Netherlands Iceland El Salvador Guatemala Panama Costa Rica Nicaragua Honduras Belize Mexico Trinidad & Tobago Puerto Rico Dominican Republic Haiti Jamaica The Bahamas Cuba Vanuatu Australia Solomon Islands Fiji New Caledonia New Zealand Eritrea Ethiopia Djibouti Somalia Kenya Uganda Tanzania Rwanda Burundi Madagascar Namibia Botswana South Africa Lesotho Swaziland Zimbabwe Mozambique Malawi Zambia Angola Democratic Repbulic of Congo Republic of Congo Gabon Equatorial Guinea Central African Republic Cameroon Nigeria Togo Ghana Burkina Fassu Cote d'Ivoire Liberia Sierra Leone Guinea Guinea Bissau The Gambia Senegal Mali Mauritania Niger Western Sahara Sudan Chad Egypt Libya Tunisia Morocco Algeria


GuamJapanKiribatiPapua New GuineaPalauMarshall IslandsPhilippinesUnited States

 Photo Album   (More...



Western Caroline Islands Operation/Battle for Ulithi Atoll
Start Year
1944
End Year
1944

Description
Ulithi Atoll, also known as the Mackenzie Islands is a coral atoll in the Yap Islands, the western part of the Carolines. There are some 40 islets withn a total land area of 1.75 square miles (4.5 square km). It is located about 190 km east of Yap. The atoll’s inhabitants are probably of mixed Polynesian and Micronesian origins and speak Ulithian, an Austronesian language. It is one of the greatest natural harbors in the world. Ulithi appears to have been first sighted by Portuguese navigators (1526). No other record exists until Spanish Jesuit missionaries led by Juan Antonio Cantova landed (1731). Along with rest of the Carolines, the Germans purchased it from the Spanish and Japan seized it during World War I. After the War, the League of Nations awarded a mandate to the Japanese. The Japanese made little use of Ulithi, but did site a seaplane base there. They had a radio and weather station on Ulithi and the Imperial Navy had occasionally used the lagoon as an anchorage. The United States used it very differently. The Pacific Fleet at first avoided landinfs in The Carolines. What they wanted was the Marianas to the north wherevair bases could be used to bomb the Japanese Home Islands. Japanese garrisons in the Carlines, luke Truk, were neutralized rather than invaded, avoiding costly landings. As the Americans moved west toward the Philippines, it became obvious that a forward supply base was needed. Naval planners bgan asessing Ulithi. The Japanese who has established garison all over the Central Pacific, somehow failed to perceive the vast strategic importance of Ulithi. The atoll with its magnificent harbor was precisely what the pacific Fleet needed for its operations in the Western Pacific. The decisive Japanese defeat in the Battle of the Philippines Sea meant that the Pacific Fleet faced no naval opposition (June 1944). The Japanese withdrw to bases west of the Philippines and the Home Islands and began tom plan a naval battle to resist the anticipated American invasion of the Philippines. More surprising, the Japanese did not garrison Ulithi Atoll. A regiment of the US Army's 81st Division landed unopposed (September 23, 1944). A regiment of the US Army's 81st Division landed unopposed (September 23, 1944). They simply walked ashore and took possession of the Atoll. It was a gift of unimaginable value, a starategic prize that would play an important role in the final phase of the Pacific War. Tragically, the Americans and Japnese in the same month would fight an extended pitched battle for Pelilu in the Palaus, another chain in the Carolines of virtually no value. A battalion of Seabees followed. While a magificent natural harbor, it was totally undeveloped. The survey ship USS Sumner) assessed the lagoon and concluded it was capable of accomodating an stonishing 700 vessels. This was more than Pearl Harbor and then Majuro after the seizure of the Marshalls could handle. The Pacific Fleet rapidly turned it into the major supply base for major operations in the last year of the War (the Philippines and Okinawa). This was done with little publicity, but the Japanese eventually found out what they had conceded to the Americans without a fight. Japanese midgit subnarines attacked islamd in the harbor, but despite their success had no real impact on the supply operations there. After the War, Ulithi was used as a military radio outpost. 
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1944
To Year
1944
 
Last Updated:
Jul 21, 2009
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  74 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Dikel, Samuel, PO2, (1942-1946)
  • Jamison, William, LT, (1941-1945)
  • McBride, Carl Edward, S2c, (1943-1947)
  • Raynor, John, PO3, (1944-1946)
  • Seamster, Wilbur Lee, S2c, (1943-1946)
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