Couillard, Benjamin, AD3

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
32 kb
View Reflection Shadow Box View Time Line
Last Rank
Petty Officer Third Class
Last Primary NEC
AD-0000-Aviation Machinist's Mate
Last Rating/NEC Group
Aviation Machinist's Mate
Primary Unit
1945-1946, AD-0000, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)/Naval Air Technical Services Facility (NATSF)
Service Years
1943 - 1946
Voice Edition
AD-Aviation Machinist's Mate

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

440 kb

Home State
Mississippi
Mississippi
Year of Birth
1927
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Diane Short (TWS Chief Admin), SA to remember Couillard, Benjamin (Couillard), AD3.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
3205 Montview Dr.
Chattanooga,TN

Date of Passing
Apr 15, 2017
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

WW II Honorable Discharge Pin


 Unofficial Badges 

Order of the Shellback US Navy Honorable Discharge


 Military Association Memberships
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW)WW II Memorial National RegistryUSS Yorktown CV-10 Association
  1985, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2000, WW II Memorial National Registry [Verified]
  2016, USS Yorktown CV-10 Association [Verified]


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Retired! Was a CRNA for 38 years. I enjoy keeping in touch with my shipmates (the ones that are left!) , They are the greatest guys in the world!

   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Countries Deployed To or Visited

PO3 Benjamin Coulliard 1943-1946

Svalbard Spain United States of America Antarctica South Georgia Falkland Islands Bolivia Peru Ecuador Colombia Venezuela Guyana Suriname French Guiana Brazil Paraguay Uruguay Argentina Chile Greenland Canada United States of America United States of America Israel Jordan Cyprus Qatar United Arab Emirates Oman Yemen Saudia Arabia Iraq Afghanistan Turkmenistan Iran Syria Singapore China Mongolia Papua New Guinea Brunei Indonesia Malaysia Malaysia Tiawan Philippines Vietnam Cambodia Laos Thailand Burma Bangladesh Sri Lanka India Bhutan Nepal Pakistan Afghanistan Turkmenistan Tajikistan Kyrgyzstan Uzbekistan Japan North Korea South Korea Russia Kazakhstan Russia Montenegro Portugal Azerbaijan Armenia Georgia Ukraine Moldova Belarus Romania Bulgaria Macedonia Serbia Bosonia & Herzegovina Turkey Greece Albania Croatia Hungary Slovakia Slovenia Malta Spain Portugal Spain France Italy Italy Austria Switzerland Belgium France Ireland United Kingdom Norway Sweden Finland Estonia Latvia Lithuania Russia Poland Czech Republic Germany Denmark The Netherlands Iceland El Salvador Guatemala Panama Costa Rica Nicaragua Honduras Belize Mexico Trinidad & Tobago Puerto Rico Dominican Republic Haiti Jamaica The Bahamas Cuba Vanuatu Australia Solomon Islands Fiji New Caledonia New Zealand Eritrea Ethiopia Djibouti Somalia Kenya Uganda Tanzania Rwanda Burundi Madagascar Namibia Botswana South Africa Lesotho Swaziland Zimbabwe Mozambique Malawi Zambia Angola Democratic Repbulic of Congo Republic of Congo Gabon Equatorial Guinea Central African Republic Cameroon Nigeria Togo Ghana Burkina Fassu Cote d'Ivoire Liberia Sierra Leone Guinea Guinea Bissau The Gambia Senegal Mali Mauritania Niger Western Sahara Sudan Chad Egypt Libya Tunisia Morocco Algeria


GuamJapanKiribatiPapua New GuineaPalauMarshall IslandsPhilippinesUnited States

 Photo Album   (More...



World War II
Start Year
1941
End Year
1945

Description
Overview of World War II 

World War II killed more people, involved more nations, and cost more money than any other war in history. Altogether, 70 million people served in the armed forces during the war, and 17 million combatants died. Civilian deaths were ever greater. At least 19 million Soviet civilians, 10 million Chinese, and 6 million European Jews lost their lives during the war.

World War II was truly a global war. Some 70 nations took part in the conflict, and fighting took place on the continents of Africa, Asia, and Europe, as well as on the high seas. Entire societies participated as soldiers or as war workers, while others were persecuted as victims of occupation and mass murder.

World War II cost the United States a million causalities and nearly 400,000 deaths. In both domestic and foreign affairs, its consequences were far-reaching. It ended the Depression, brought millions of married women into the workforce, initiated sweeping changes in the lives of the nation's minority groups, and dramatically expanded government's presence in American life.

The War at Home & Abroad

On September 1, 1939, World War II started when Germany invaded Poland. By November 1942, the Axis powers controlled territory from Norway to North Africa and from France to the Soviet Union. After defeating the Axis in North Africa in May 1941, the United States and its Allies invaded Sicily in July 1943 and forced Italy to surrender in September. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, the Allies landed in Northern France. In December, a German counteroffensive (the Battle of the Bulge) failed. Germany surrendered in May 1945.

The United States entered the war following a surprise attack by Japan on the U.S. Pacific fleet in Hawaii. The United States and its Allies halted Japanese expansion at the Battle of Midway in June 1942 and in other campaigns in the South Pacific. From 1943 to August 1945, the Allies hopped from island to island across the Central Pacific and also battled the Japanese in China, Burma, and India. Japan agreed to surrender on August 14, 1945 after the United States dropped the first atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Consequences:

1. The war ended Depression unemployment and dramatically expanded government's presence in American life. It led the federal government to create a War Production Board to oversee conversion to a wartime economy and the Office of Price Administration to set prices on many items and to supervise a rationing system.

2. During the war, African Americans, women, and Mexican Americans founded new opportunities in industry. But Japanese Americans living on the Pacific coast were relocated from their homes and placed in internment camps.

The Dawn of the Atomic Age

In 1939, Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Roosevelt, warning him that the Nazis might be able to build an atomic bomb. On December 2, 1942, Enrico Fermi, an Italian refugee, produced the first self-sustained, controlled nuclear chain reaction in Chicago.

To ensure that the United States developed a bomb before Nazi Germany did, the federal government started the secret $2 billion Manhattan Project. On July 16, 1945, in the New Mexico desert near Alamogordo, the Manhattan Project's scientists exploded the first atomic bomb.

It was during the Potsdam negotiations that President Harry Truman learned that American scientists had tested the first atomic bomb. On August 6, 1945, the Enola Gay, a B-29 Superfortress, released an atomic bomb over Hiroshima, Japan. Between 80,000 and 140,000 people were killed or fatally wounded. Three days later, a second bomb fell on Nagasaki. About 35,000 people were killed. The following day Japan sued for peace.

President Truman's defenders argued that the bombs ended the war quickly, avoiding the necessity of a costly invasion and the probable loss of tens of thousands of American lives and hundreds of thousands of Japanese lives. His critics argued that the war might have ended even without the atomic bombings. They maintained that the Japanese economy would have been strangled by a continued naval blockade, and that Japan could have been forced to surrender by conventional firebombing or by a demonstration of the atomic bomb's power.

The unleashing of nuclear power during World War II generated hope of a cheap and abundant source of energy, but it also produced anxiety among large numbers of people in the United States and around the world.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1941
To Year
1945
 
Last Updated:
Nov 13, 2017
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  1758 Also There at This Battle:
  • Abbott, Floyd Eugene, PO3, (1943-1946)
  • Abramson, Arthur, LT, (1942-1945)
  • Agesen, Bruce Martin, LCDR, (1942-1966)
  • Ahlfs, Jerold Francis, CDR, (1940-1954)
  • Albertson, Dean Howard, LTJG, (1943-1953)
  • Alexander, William Patrick, S2c, (1942-1945)
  • Alexatos, Michael Stephen, CAPT, (1942-1970)
  • Ambellan, Charles Herbert, CAPT, (1942-1970)
  • Anderson, Leroy Marvin, LT, (1942-1946)
  • Arnold, Arlington Reid, LTJG, (1941-1946)
  • Arnold, John Jacob, LCDR, (1942-1976)
  • Aschenbrenner, John, S1c, (1943-1945)
  • Azer, John, CAPT, (1928-1948)
  • Badger, Heber Jenkins, CAPT, (1941-1961)
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011