Gothreau, Eugene E., SM2c

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
View Time Line
Last Rank
Signalman 2nd Class
Last Primary NEC
SM-0000-Signalman
Last Rating/NEC Group
Signalman
Primary Unit
1945-1945, Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT)/Commander Pacific Fleet (COMPACFLT)
Service Years
1942 - 1945
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Order of the Golden Dragon
Panama Canal
SM-Signalman

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
New Hampshire
New Hampshire
Year of Birth
1924
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Bersley H. Thomas, Jr. (Tom), SMCS to remember Gothreau, Eugene E., SM2c.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Berlin
Last Address
Not Specified

Casualty Date
Apr 11, 1945
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Other Explosive Device
Location
Okinawa
Conflict
World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Okinawa Gunto Operation
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 

Order of the Golden Dragon


 Military Association Memberships
Military Order of Foreign Wars of the United StatesNational Association of Destroyer Veterans (Tin Can Sailors)Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW)
  1941, Military Order of Foreign Wars of the United States - Assoc. Page
  1944, National Association of Destroyer Veterans (Tin Can Sailors) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1945, Military Order of the World Wars (MOWW)



Mariana and Palau Islands Campaign (1944)/Battle of Philippine Sea
Start Year
1944
End Year
1944

Description
The Battle of the Philippine Sea (June 19–20, 1944) was a major naval battle of World War II that eliminated the Imperial Japanese Navy's ability to conduct large-scale carrier actions. It took place during the United States' amphibious invasion of the Mariana Islands during the Pacific War. The battle was the last of five major "carrier-versus-carrier" engagements between American and Japanese naval forces, and pitted elements of the United States Navy's Fifth Fleet against ships and aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy's Mobile Fleet and nearby island garrisons.

The aerial part of the battle was nicknamed the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot by American aviators for the severely disproportional loss ratio inflicted upon Japanese aircraft by American pilots and anti-aircraft gunners. During a debriefing after the first two air battles a pilot from USS Lexington remarked "Why, hell, it was just like an old-time turkey shoot down home!" The outcome is generally attributed to American improvements in pilot and crew training and tactics, technology (including the top-secret anti-aircraft proximity fuze), and ship and aircraft design. Although at the time the battle appeared to be a missed opportunity to destroy the Japanese fleet, the Imperial Japanese Navy had lost the bulk of its carrier air strength and would never recover. During the course of the battle, American submarines torpedoed and sank two of the largest Japanese fleet carriers taking part in the battle.

This was the largest carrier-to-carrier battle in history.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1944
To Year
1944
 
Last Updated:
Apr 5, 2009
   
Personal Memories

Memories
The action was a disaster for the Japanese forces who lost almost all of their carrier-borne aircraft and a third of the carriers involved in the battle. It was so one-sided that American pilots nicknamed it "The Great Marianas Turkey Shoot"

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  251 Also There at This Battle:
  • Beckwith, John Edward, S1c, (1942-1945)
  • Block, Charles John, CPO, (1938-1945)
  • Breaux, Calvin, SN, (1944-1946)
  • Carter, Loyd, PO3, (1941-1945)
  • Cote, Arthur, S1c, (1943-1946)
  • Crowell, Marshall Medford, F1c, (1943-1945)
  • Dikel, Samuel, PO2, (1942-1946)
  • Earnest, Albert, CAPT, (1941-1972)
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