King, Jerome H. Jr., VADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Vice Admiral
Last Primary NEC
111X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Surface Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1972-1974, CNO - OPNAV/Surface Warfare OPNAV N86
Service Years
1941 - 1974
Vice Admiral
Vice Admiral

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

37 kb

Home State
Ohio
Ohio
Year of Birth
1919
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Bersley H Thomas, Jr. (Tom), SMCS to remember King, Jerome H. Jr., VADM USN(Ret).

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Contact Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
Youngstown

Date of Passing
Jun 18, 2008
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

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In 1941 King graduated from Yale University and received his naval commission through the NROTC program. He is perhaps the first NROTC graduate to achieve three-star rank in the U.S. Navy. He spent most of World War II serving in two light cruisers, the Trenton (CL-11) and Mobile (CL-63). Later in the 1940s he was officer in charge of a school for gunner's mate training in Anacostia, D.C., executive officer of the destroyer Moale (DD-693), and attended postgraduate school to learn about nuclear weapons. In the 1950s served on the staff of the Surface Antisubmarine Development Detachment of the Operational Development Force, commanded the destroyer Bache (DDE-470), was the nuclear weapons requirements officer on the OpNav staff, and a student in at the Naval War College. While on the staff of Commander Carrier Division Six, he served under two future CNOs, George Anderson and Thomas Moorer. Later he commanded Destroyer Division 601, Nuclear Weapons Training Center, Atlantic, and the destroyer tender Yellowstone (AD-27). He was planning officer on the Seventh Fleet staff when the Vietnam War began in earnest in the mid-1960s. Later in that decade he was executive assistant to CNOs David McDonald and Thomas Moorer, Commander Destroyer Squadron One and Commander Antisubmarine Warfare Group One. In the latter capacity he presided in 1969 over the international inquiry into the collision between the Australian carrier Melbourne and U.S. destroyer Frank E. Evans (DD-754). Following duty in OpNav, in the spring of 1970 he succeeded Vice Admiral Elmo Zumwalt as Commander Naval Forces Vietnam. He had a difficult, frustrating tour as the war was winding down. He concluded his career in Washington as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Surface Warfare) and as J-3 on the Joint Staff. He retired from active duty in 1974. The oral history contains a detailed description of his battle against lung cancer in the 1990s. King passed away in 2008.

   
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Mariana and Palau Islands Campaign (1944)/Battle of Philippine Sea
Start Year
1944
End Year
1944

Description
The Battle of the Philippine Sea (June 19–20, 1944) was a major naval battle of World War II that eliminated the Imperial Japanese Navy's ability to conduct large-scale carrier actions. It took place during the United States' amphibious invasion of the Mariana Islands during the Pacific War. The battle was the last of five major "carrier-versus-carrier" engagements between American and Japanese naval forces, and pitted elements of the United States Navy's Fifth Fleet against ships and aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy's Mobile Fleet and nearby island garrisons.

The aerial part of the battle was nicknamed the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot by American aviators for the severely disproportional loss ratio inflicted upon Japanese aircraft by American pilots and anti-aircraft gunners. During a debriefing after the first two air battles a pilot from USS Lexington remarked "Why, hell, it was just like an old-time turkey shoot down home!" The outcome is generally attributed to American improvements in pilot and crew training and tactics, technology (including the top-secret anti-aircraft proximity fuze), and ship and aircraft design. Although at the time the battle appeared to be a missed opportunity to destroy the Japanese fleet, the Imperial Japanese Navy had lost the bulk of its carrier air strength and would never recover. During the course of the battle, American submarines torpedoed and sank two of the largest Japanese fleet carriers taking part in the battle.

This was the largest carrier-to-carrier battle in history.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1944
To Year
1944
 
Last Updated:
Jan 5, 2009
   
Personal Memories

Memories
On 6 June the carrier force sortied from Majuro again. By the 11th they were in the Marianas, striking at Saipan, Tinian, Guam, and Rota. From then through the 17th its planes and ships ranged from the Volcano and Bonin Islands to the southernmost Marianas supporting the assault on Saipan and preventing Japanese reinforcements from reaching that beleaguered island and the next target, Guam. On the 18th searches for a Japanese Fleet, reported en route from the Philippines, began to the west of the Marianas. The following day the Battle of the Philippine Sea opened with a Japanese carrier-based aircraft attack on the ships covering the Saipan assault.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  237 Also There at This Battle:
  • Block, Charles John, CPO, (1938-1945)
  • Breaux, Calvin, SN, (1944-1946)
  • Carter, Loyd, PO3, (1941-1945)
  • Cote, Arthur, S1c, (1943-1946)
  • Crowell, Marshall Medford, F1c, (1943-1945)
  • Dikel, Samuel, PO2, (1942-1946)
  • Earnest, Albert, CAPT, (1941-1972)
  • Freeman, Harold, CMC, (1943-1975)
  • Fuller, Leroy, PO1, (1941-1945)
  • Greer, Howard E., VADM, (1941-1978)
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