Bennak, John, MM1c

Fallen
 
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Last Rank
Petty Officer First Class
Last Primary NEC
MM-0000-Machinist's Mate
Last Rating/NEC Group
Machinists Mate
Primary Unit
1942-1943, MM-0000, USS Helena (CL-50)
Service Years
1939 - 1943
Official/Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Order of the Golden Dragon
MM-Machinists Mate
One Hash Mark

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home Country
United States
United States
Year of Birth
Not Specified
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Nicole Summers, MMFN to remember Bennak, John, PO1.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
Not Specified

Casualty Date
Jul 06, 1943
 
Cause
Hostile, Died while Missing
Reason
Other Explosive Device
Location
Solomon Islands
Conflict
World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Northern Solomon Islands Campaign (1943-44)/Battle of Kula Gulf
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 

Pearl Harbor Memorial Medallion Order of the Golden Dragon


 Military Association Memberships
World War II Fallen
  2013, World War II Fallen [Verified]

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Guadalcanal Campaign (1942-42)/Cape Esperance (Second Savo)
Start Year
1942
End Year
1942

Description
Cape Esperance (Second Savo) October 11–12, 1942. The Battle of Cape Esperance, also known as the Second Battle of Savo Island and, in Japanese sources, as the Sea Battle of Savo Island, took place on 11–12 October 1942, and was a naval battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II between the Imperial Japanese Navy and United States Navy. The battle was the second of four major surface engagements during the Guadalcanal campaign and took place at the entrance to the strait between Savo Island and Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands. Cape Esperance (9°15′S 159°42′E) is the northernmost point on Guadalcanal, and the battle took its name from this point.

On the night of 11 October, Japanese naval forces in the Solomon Islands area—under the command of Vice Admiral Gunichi Mikawa—sent a major supply and reinforcement convoy to their forces on Guadalcanal. The convoy consisted of two seaplane tenders and six destroyers and was commanded by Rear Admiral Takatsugu Jojima. At the same time, but in a separate operation, three heavy cruisers and two destroyers—under the command of Rear Admiral Aritomo Goto-were to bombard the Allied airfield on Guadalcanal (called Henderson Field by the Allies) with the object of destroying Allied aircraft and the airfield's facilities.

Shortly before midnight on 11 October, a U.S force of four cruisers and five destroyers—under the command of Rear Admiral Norman Scott—intercepted Goto's force as it approached Savo Island near Guadalcanal. Taking the Japanese by surprise, Scott's warships sank one of Goto's cruisers and one of his destroyers, heavily damaged another cruiser, mortally wounded Goto, and forced the rest of Goto's warships to abandon the bombardment mission and retreat. During the exchange of gunfire, one of Scott's destroyers was sunk and one cruiser and another destroyer were heavily damaged. In the meantime, the Japanese supply convoy successfully completed unloading at Guadalcanal and began its return journey without being discovered by Scott's force. Later on the morning of 12 October, four Japanese destroyers from the supply convoy turned back to assist Goto's retreating, damaged warships. Air attacks by U.S. aircraft from Henderson Field sank two of these destroyers later that day.

As with the preceding naval engagements, around Guadalcanal, the strategic outcome was inconsequential because neither the Japanese nor United States navies secured operational control of the waters around Guadalcanal as a result of this action. However, the Battle of Cape Esperance provided a significant morale boost to the US Navy after the disaster of Savo Island.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1942
To Year
1942
 
Last Updated:
Oct 21, 2008
   
Personal Memories

Memories
Helena's next action was near Rennell Island, again in support of a movement of transports into Guadalcanal. Air attacks from Henderson Field had slowed down the Tokyo Express for several days, so 11 October 1942 the Japanese poured everything they could deliver against the airstrip, hoping to neutralize air operations long enough to bring heavy troop reinforcements during the night. The Japanese fleet closed and by 18:10 was less than 100 miles from Savo Island.

Helena, equipped with superior radar, was first to contact the enemy and first to open fire at 23:46. When firing had ceased in this Battle of Cape Esperance in Ironbottom Sound, Helena had sunk cruiser Furutaka and destroyer Fubuki.

   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  107 Also There at This Battle:
  • Brosnan, Ryan
  • Burlingame, Archie, S1c, (1923-1943)
  • Butler, William Clayton, RADM, (1926-1959)
  • Ward, Harold, PO1, (1940-1959)
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