Fluckey, Eugene Bennett, RADM

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Last Primary NEC
112X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Submarine Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1968-1972, 112X, Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG)
Service Years
1935 - 1972
Rear Admiral Upper Half
Rear Admiral Upper Half

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

93 kb

Home State
District Of Columbia
Year of Birth
1913
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Robert Cox, YNCS to remember Fluckey, Eugene Bennett (Lucky), RADM USN(Ret).

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Washington, DC
Last Address
Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, Maryland

Date of Passing
Jun 28, 2007
 
Location of Interment
U.S. Naval Academy Cemetery - Annapolis, Maryland
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Unknown

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Dept of Dist of Col.
  1945, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW), Dept of Dist of Col. (Member) (Temple Hills, Maryland) - Chap. Page


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

Admiral Eugene B. Fluckey, went on Eternal Patrol at 11:45 PM EDT on June 28, 2007. At time of death he was in the Hospice Unit at Anne Arundel Hospital, Annapolis Md.

Hand salute to our Greatest American Submarine Hero!

Please add Admiral Fluckey to your list of shipmates and visit often.
  • Born in Washington, DC on October 5, 1913 and was raised in Neoga, Illinois.
     
  • In 1931 he entered the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, graduated in 1935 and received his commission as an Ensign.
     
  • Initial assignments were aboard the battleship Nevada (BB-36) and the destroyer McCormick (DD-223).
     
  • Entered the submarine service in 1938 by instruction at Naval Submarine School, Groton, Connecticut and assigned to the submarine S-42.
     
  • In 1941-1942 he completed five war patrols on Bonita (SS-165) and was promoted to Lieutenant.
     
  • As Commanding Officer of Barb (SS-220) he established himself as one of the greatest submarine skippers, credited with the most tonnage sunk by a U.S. skipper during World War II. 17 ships including a carrier, cruiser, and frigate.
     
  • Awarded four Navy Cross Medals for extraordinary heroism during the eighth, ninth, tenth, and twelfth war patrols of Barb. During his famous eleventh patrol, he received the Medal of Honor. Barb received two Presidential Unit Citations for the eighth and eleventh patrols and the Navy Unit Commendation for the twelfth patrol.
     
  • Was the Personal Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz from late 1945 to mid-1947.
     
  • Selected for flag rank in 1960 and reported as Commander, Amphibious Group 4, presidency of the Board of Inspection and Survey and a temporary assignment as Task Force Director of the Shipyards Appraisal Group.
     
  • In June 1964 to June 1966 Rear Admiral Fluckey served as Commander Submarine Force, Pacific.
     
  • Served as Director of Naval Intelligence.
     
  • Prior to his death he was the most decorated living American.
     
  • Was one of six Eagle Scouts known to have received the Medal of Honor.
This profile was created on June 29, 2007.
   
Other Comments:

Medal of Honor citation:

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Barb during her 11th war patrol along the east coast of China from 19 December 1944 to 15 February 1945. After sinking a large enemy ammunition ship and damaging additional tonnage during a running 2-hour night battle on 8 January, Comdr. Fluckey, in an exceptional feat of brilliant deduction and bold tracking on 25 January, located a concentration of more than 30 enemy ships in the lower reaches of Nankuan Chiang (Mamkwan Harbor). Fully aware that a safe retirement would necessitate an hour's run at full speed through the uncharted, mined, and rock-obstructed waters, he bravely ordered, "Battle station — torpedoes!" In a daring penetration of the heavy enemy screen, and riding in 5 fathoms [9 m] of water, he launched the Barb's last forward torpedoes at 3,000 yard [2.7 km] range. Quickly bringing the ship's stern tubes to bear, he turned loose 4 more torpedoes into the enemy, obtaining 8 direct hits on 6 of the main targets to explode a large ammunition ship and cause inestimable damage by the resultant flying shells and other pyrotechnics. Clearing the treacherous area at high speed, he brought the Barb through to safety and 4 days later sank a large Japanese freighter to complete a record of heroic combat achievement, reflecting the highest credit upon Comdr. Fluckey, his gallant officers and men, and the U.S. Naval Service."


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  1966-1968, 112X, Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI)

Rear Admiral Upper Half

From Month/Year
- / 1966

To Month/Year
- / 1968

Unit
Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) Unit Page

Rank
Rear Admiral Upper Half

NEC
112X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Submarine Warfare

Location
Suitland

Country/State
Maryland
 
 
 Patch
 Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) Details

Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI)

Type
Garrison - Base Station

Existing/Disbanded
Existing

Parent Unit
Major Commands

Strength
Group

Created/Owned By
Not Specified
   

Last Updated: Jun 29, 2007
   
Memories For This Unit

Chain of Command
From 1966 to 1968 Rear Admiral Fluckey served as Director of Naval Intelligence.

Other Memories
The Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) was established in the United States Navy in 1882. ONI was established to "seek out and report" on the advancements in other nations' navies.

ONI's position as the naval intelligence arm began in earnest when the United States declared war on Spain in 1898 in response to the sinking of the U.S. battleship Maine in the harbor of Spanish-controlled Havana, Cuba. ONI's powers grew as it became responsible for the "protection of Navy Personnel, censorship and the ferreting out of spies and saboteurs."

In 1929 the Chief of Naval Operations made these functions the permanent duties of ONI. During World War II, Naval Intelligence became responsible for the translation, evaluation and dissemination of intercepted Japanese communications, and its budget and staff grew significantly. While other parts of the Navy were downsized after the war, Fleet Admiral Nimitz ensured ONI's continued strength, which was to prove important during the Cold War.

The Office of Naval Intelligence is the oldest continuously operating intelligence service in the United States. ONI headquarters are at the National Maritime Intelligence Center (NMIC) in Suitland, Maryland.

   
   
My Photos For This Duty Station
No Available Photos
11 Members Also There at Same Time
Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI)

Craven, Melvin, CPO, (1950-1971) DK DK-0000 Chief Petty Officer
Hahn, Joseph, CWO3, (1952-1974) YN YN-2505 Chief Petty Officer
Young, David, PO1, (1960-1967) YN YN-9556 Petty Officer First Class
Benner, David, MCPO, (1962-1992) YN YN-2505 Petty Officer Second Class
KEYS, Thomas, PO2, (1954-1966) YN YN-0000 Petty Officer Second Class
Lewicke, Jorge, PO2, (1958-1966) YN YN-2505 Petty Officer Second Class
Harlfinger II, Frederick, VADM, (1935-1974) Rear Admiral Lower Half
Naval Intelligence Support Center (NISC)

Miller, David, SCPO, (1962-1981) STS 1591 Senior Chief Petty Officer
Reed, Robert, CPO, (1960-1986) Petty Officer Second Class
ONI-0397

Pentecost, Frederick, PO2, (1961-1966) YN YN-2505 Petty Officer Second Class
Suitland, MD

Sampay-Turnley, Theresa, SN, (1965-1967) SK SK-0000 Seaman

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