Cox, Robert Leon, LT

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Lieutenant
Last Primary NEC
000X-Unknown Navy Officer Classification/ Designator
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1941-1944, 112X, USS Seawolf (SS-197)
Service Years
1937 - 1944
Lieutenant
Lieutenant

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
New Mexico
New Mexico
Year of Birth
1917
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Tommy Burgdorf (Birddog), FC2 to remember Cox, Robert Leon, LT.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Santa Rita, NM
Last Address
518 N 25 St
Corvallis, Oregon
(Wife~Elizabeth Willard Cox)

Casualty Date
Oct 03, 1944
 
Cause
Hostile, Died while Missing
Reason
Lost At Sea-Unrecovered
Location
Pacific Ocean
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Manila American Cemetery - Taguig City, Philippines
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Walls of the Missing (Cenotaph)

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
World War II FallenUnited States Navy Memorial WW II Memorial National RegistryThe National Gold Star Family Registry
  1944, World War II Fallen
  2011, United States Navy Memorial - Assoc. Page
  2013, WW II Memorial National Registry
  2013, The National Gold Star Family Registry


 Ribbon Bar
Submarine Officer Badge
Submarine Combat Patrol Badge - 4 Patrols

 
 Unit Assignments/ Advancement Schools
USS Seawolf (SS-197)
  1941-1944, 112X, USS Seawolf (SS-197)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1941-1942 Philippine Islands Campaign (1941-42)/Battle of the Philippines
  1942-1944 Submarine War Patrols
  1944-1944 USS Seawolf (SS-197)
 Colleges Attended 
University of Arizona
  1935-1939, University of Arizona
 Other News, Events and Photographs
 
  Service Number O-103231
  Oct 20, 1937, Pay Entry Date
  Oct 01, 1942, Promoted to Lieutenant Junior Grade
  Oct 01, 1943, Promoted to Lieutenant
  Sep 27, 2019, General Photos1
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

Seawolf left Brisbane on 21 September 1944 beginning her 15th patrol, and arrived at Manus on 29 September. Leaving Manus on the same day, Seawolf was directed to carry certain stores and Army personnel to the east coast of Samar. 

On 3 October Seawolf and Narwhal exchanged SJ [Surface search radar for submarines] radar recognition signals at 0756. Later the same day an enemy submarine attack was made at 2°-32'N, 129°-18'E, which resulted in the sinking of U.S.S. Shelton (DE407). Since there were four friendly submarines in the vicinity of this attack, they were directed to give their positions, and the other three did, but Seawolf was not heard from. On 4 October, Seawolf again was directed to report her position, and again she failed to.

U.S.S. Rowell (DE403) and an aircraft attacked a submarine in the vicinity of the attack on Shelton, having at that time no knowledge of any friendly submarines in the area, and it was thought that Seawolf must be held down by these antisubmarine activities. It is possible that Seawolf was the submarine attacked.

The report from Rowell indicates that an apparently lethal attack was conducted in conjunction with a plane which marked the spot with dye. Rowell established sound contact on the submarine, which then sent long dashes and dots whichRowell stated bore no resemblance to the existing recognition signals. After one of the several hedgehog attacks a small amount of debris and a large air bubble were seen. It has been established that the Japanese submarine RO-41 sankShelton on 3 October, and was able to return to Japan. 

In view of the above facts, and the fact that there is no attack listed in the Japanese report of antisubmarine attacks which could account for the loss of Seawolf, it is possible that Seawolf was sunk by friendly forces in an antisubmarine attack on 3 October 1944, in the vicinity of 02°-32'N, 129°-18'E.

It is also possible that she was lost due to an operational casualty or as a result of an unrecorded enemy attack. 

Source Naval History and Heritage Command

   
Comments/Citation
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