Brindupke, Charles Frederic, CDR

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Last Rank
Commander
Last Primary NEC
000X-Unknown Navy Officer Classification/ Designator
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1943-1944, USS Tullibee (SS-284)
Service Years
1932 - 1944
Commander
Commander

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

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Home State
California
California
Year of Birth
1908
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Kent Weekly (SS/DSV) (DBF), EMCS to remember Brindupke, Charles Frederic, CDR.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
San Francisco, CA
Last Address
Not Specified

Casualty Date
Mar 26, 1944
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Other Explosive Device
Location
South China Sea
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Manila American Cemetery - Taguig City, Philippines
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Walls of the Missing

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 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
On 5 March 1944, Tullibee, commanded by Cdr. C. F. Brindupke, departed Pearl Harbor to start her fourth war patrol. She stopped at Midway to top off with fuel, and having left that place on 14 March, she was not heard from again. The area assigned to Tullibee was an open sea area north of Palau, and she was to cooperate with surface forces in the first carrier strike on Palau.

Tullibee was to leave her area not later than 24 April 1944, and on that date a dispatch was sent directing her to proceed to Majuro for refit. She was expected at Majuro about 4 May, but instructions stated that a submarine unable to transmit would not go to Majuro, but to Midway. On 6 May 1944, Midway was alerted for a submarine returning without transmission facilities, but the lookout was not rewarded and Tullibee was presumed lost on 15 May 1944.

The following story of Tullibee's loss is taken from a statement made by the lone survivor, C.W. Kuykendall, GM2c. He reports that the boat arrived on station, 25 March, and on the night of 26 March a radar contact was found to be on a convoy consisting of a large troop and cargo ship, two medium sized freighters, two escort vessels and a large destroyer.

Having solved the convoy's speed and course, Tullibee made several surface runs on the large transport, but held fire, being unable to see her due to squally weather. The escorts had detected the submarine's presence, and dropped 15 to 20 depth charges. The submarine came in to 3,000 yards, still unable to see the target, and fired two bow tubes. A minute or two later a terrific concussion shook the boat, and Kuykendall, who had been on the bridge, soon found himself struggling in the water. Since range and bearing of escorts was known, the survivor states that he is sure the explosion was the result of a circular run of one of Tullibee's torpedoes.

There were shouting men in the water when Kuykendall first regained consciousness after the blast, but after about ten minutes everything was silent, and he never again saw or heard any of the other Tullibee men. At 1000 on 27 March, an escort vessel located the swimming man, and after firing on him with machine guns, came in and picked him up. He learned here that the transport they had fired at had sunk.

The story of his captivity is much the same as the stories of survivors of Grenadier, Sculpin, Tang, Perch, and other U.S. submarines. He was questioned assiduously by English speaking officers, and beaten when he refused to give any more information than international law required. In April 1944, he was taken to Ofuna Naval Interrogation Camp, where he stayed until 30 September. From that date until rescue on 4 September 1945, he was forced to work in the copper mines of Ashio.

This submarine began her career in the Submarine Force in July 1943, with a patrol in the western Caroline Islands. In this patrol she sank one freighter and damaged another. Her second patrol was in the area south of Formosa off the China coast; here she sank a transport ship and damaged a large tanker and another transport. On her third patrol, in the Marianas area, Tullibee sank a small freighter. This gave Tullibee a total of three ships sunk, totaling 15,500 tons, and three damaged, for 22,000 tons.
   
Comments/Citation

 
Name of Award
Silver Star
Year Awarded
1943
Details behind Award:
Awarded for actions during World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Charles Frederic Brindupke (NSN: 0-71489), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. TULLIPBEE (SS-284) during the SECOND War Patrol of that Submarine from 28 September to 16 November 1943, in enemy Japanese-controlled waters in the Pacific War Area. Displaying brilliant tactical skill and fearless determination, Commander Brindupke attacked a group of hostile vessels, sinking and damaging an important amount of enemy tonnage. Following the engagement, when the Japanese violently depth-charged and bombed the submarine, sending her to the bottom, he coolly and courageously extricated his ship and throughout the ensuing day skillfully avoided severe air and surface countermeasures by the enemy. During two later engagements, he inflicted extensive damage on a hostile tanker and carried out a devastating bombardment of installations on an enemy-held island. Commander Brindupke's inspiring leadership and the loyal devotion to duty of his officers and men were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
General Orders: Pacific Fleet Board of Awards: Serial 46 (February 18, 1944)
Action Date: September 28 - November 16, 1943
Service: Navy
Rank: Commander
Division: U.S.S. Tullibee (SS-284)
   
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 Duty Stations
US NavySubmarine School Officers BasicElectric Boat Company (submarine pre-commission)USS Seal (SS-183)
USS Tullibee (SS-284)
  1932-1934, USS Tennessee (BB-43)
  1934-1934, Submarine School Officers Basic
  1934-1935, SUBBASE Cavite PI
  1935-1937, USS S-40 (SS-145)
  1937-1937, Electric Boat Company (submarine pre-commission)
  1937-1939, USS Seal (SS-183)
  1939-1940, USS Overton (DD-239)
  1943-1944, USS Tullibee (SS-284)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1939-1941 Neutrality Operations in the North Atlantic
  1944-1944 USS Tullibee (SS-284) Sunk
 Colleges Attended 
United States Naval Academy
  1928-1932, United States Naval Academy2
 Other News, Events and Photographs
 
  Jul 19, 1943, USS Tullibee (SS-284) 1st War Patrol 07/1943 - 09/1943
  Sep 28, 1943, USS Tullibe (SS-284) 2nd War Patrol - 09/1943 - 11/1943
  Dec 14, 1943, USS Tullibee (SS-284) 3rd War Patrol - 12/1943 - 02/1944
  Mar 05, 1944, USS Tullibee (SS-284) 4th War Patrol - 03/1944 - 03/1944
  Mar 26, 1944, USS Tullibee sunk by own torpedo
  Mar 26, 2017, General Photos1
 Military Association Memberships
United States Navy Memorial World War II FallenWW II Memorial National RegistryThe National Gold Star Family Registry
  2017, United States Navy Memorial - Assoc. Page
  2017, World War II Fallen
  2017, WW II Memorial National Registry
  2017, The National Gold Star Family Registry
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