Ford, Gerald Rudolph, LCDR

Deceased
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Lieutenant Commander
Last Primary NEC
111X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Surface Warfare
Last Rating/NEC Group
Line Officer
Primary Unit
1946-1963, 111X, Naval Reserve Center (NRC/NRTC)
Service Years
1942 - 1946
Lieutenant Commander
Lieutenant Commander

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

119 kb

Home State
Nebraska
Nebraska
Year of Birth
1913
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Loyde McIllwain, Jr. (Bionic Frankenass), EO2 to remember Ford, Gerald Rudolph (Jerry), LCDR.

If you knew or served with this Sailor and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Grand Rapids, MI
Last Address
40471 Sand Dune Road
Rancho Mirage, California

Date of Passing
Dec 26, 2006
 
Location of Interment
Gerald R. Ford Museum - Grand Rapids, Michigan
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Post 6123, Smalley Brothers PostAmerican LegionAmerican Veterans (AMVETS)
  1946, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW), Post 6123, Smalley Brothers Post (Executive Secretary) (Windsor Locks, Connecticut) - Chap. Page
  2013, American Legion [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2013, American Veterans (AMVETS) [Verified] - Assoc. Page

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 Duty Stations
US Naval Academy Annapolis (Faculty Staff)School Assignments - StaffUSS Monterey (CVL-26)NAS Glenview IL
Commander Navy Reserve Forces Command (COMNAVRESFORCOM)Commander Navy Reserve Forces Command (COMNAVRESFORCOM)
  1942-1942, 110X, US Naval Academy Annapolis (Faculty Staff)
  1942-1943, 110X, Navy Pre-Flight School
  1943-1944, 111X, USS Monterey (CVL-26)
  1944-1945, 111X, Navy Pre-Flight School
  1945-1946, 111X, NAS Glenview IL
  1946-1946, 111X, NRC Great Lakes
  1946-1963, 111X, Naval Reserve Center (NRC/NRTC)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1942-1942 Central Pacific Campaign (1941-43)/Bombardment - Marshall and Gilbert Islands
  1944-1944 Leyte Campaign (1944)/Battle of Leyte Gulf
  1944-1944 World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Mariana and Palau Islands Campaign (1944)
 Colleges Attended 
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
  1932-1935, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
 Other News, Events and Photographs
 
  Real Name
  Transcript of military service
  Presidential bio1
  Photos11
  Mar 30, 2013, General Photos2
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
PRESIDENT GERALD R. FORD
Gerald Rudolph "Jerry" Ford, Jr. (born Leslie Lynch King, Jr. was the 38th President of the United States, serving from 1974 to 1977, and prior to this, was the 40th Vice President of the United States serving from 1973 to 1974. He was the first person appointed to the Vice Presidency under the terms of the 25th Amendment, after Spiro Agnew had resigned. When he became President upon Richard Nixon's resignation on August 9, 1974, he became the first and to date only person to have served as both Vice President and President of the United States without being elected by the Electoral College. Before ascending to the Vice Presidency, Ford served nearly 25 years as the Representative from Michigan's 5th congressional district, eight of them as the Republican Minority Leader.
 
As President, Ford signed the Helsinki Accords, marking a move toward détente in the Cold War. With the conquest of South Vietnam by North Vietnam nine months into his presidency, U.S. involvement in Vietnam essentially ended. Domestically, Ford presided over the worst economy in the four decades since the Great Depression, with growing inflation and a recession during his tenure. One of his more controversial acts was to grant a presidential pardon to President Richard Nixon for his role in the Watergate scandal. During Ford's incumbency, foreign policy was characterized in procedural terms by the increased role Congress began to play, and by the corresponding curb on the powers of the President. In 1976, Ford narrowly defeated Ronald Reagan for the Republican nomination, but lost the presidential election to Democrat Jimmy Carter.
 
Following his years as president, Ford remained active in the Republican Party. After experiencing health problems, Ford died in his home on December 26, 2006. Ford lived longer than any other U.S. president, living 93 years and 165 days, while his 895-day presidency remains the shortest of all Presidents who did not die in office.
   
Other Comments:
PRESIDENT GERALD R. FORD'S MILITARY SERVICE
Ford received a commision as ensign in the US Naval Reserve on 13 April 1942 and ultimately served 47 months on active duty during World War II. His background as a coach and trainer made him a good candidate for instructor in the Navy's V-5 (aviation cadet) program. On 20 April, he reported for active duty to the V-5 instructor school at Annapolis, Maryland. After one month of training, he went to Navy Preflight School in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where he was one of 83 instructors and taught elementary seamanship, ordnance, gunnery, first aid, and military drill. In addition, he coached in all nine sports that were offered, but mostly in swimming, boxing and football. During the one year he was at the Preflight School, he was promoted to Lieutenant Junior Grade on 2 June 1942 and to Lieutenant on 1 March 1943.
 
Applying for sea duty, Ford was sent in May 1943 to the pre-commissioning detachment for a new light aircraft carrier, USS Monterey (CVL-26) at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. From the ship's commissioning on 17 June 1943 until the end of December 1944, Ford served as the assistant navigator, athletic officer, and anti-aircraft battery officer on board Monterey. While he was on board, Monterey participated in many actions in the Pacific with the Third and Fifth Fleets during the fall of 1943 and in 1944. In 1943, the carrier helped secure Makin Island in the Gilberts, and participated in carrier strikes against Kavieng, New Ireland in 1943. During the spring of 1944, Monterey supported landings at Kwajalein and Eniwetok and participated in carrier strikes in the Marianas, Western Carolines, and northern New Guinea, as well as in the Battle of Philippine Sea. After overhaul, from September to November 1944, aircraft from Monterey launched strikes against Wake Island, participated in strikes in the Philippines and Ryukus, and supported the landings at Leyte and Mindoro.
 
Although the ship was not damaged by the Japanese forces, Monterey was one of several ships damaged by the typhoon, which hit Admiral Halsey's Third Fleet on 18-19 December 1944. The Third Fleet lost three destroyers and over 800 men during the typhoon. Monterey was damaged by a fire which was started by several of the ship's aircarft tearing loose from their cables and colliding during the storm. During the storm, Ford narrowly missed being a casualty himself. As Ford headed for his battle station on the bridge of the ship in the early morning of 18 December, the ship rolled twenty-five degrees which caused Ford to lose his footing and slide toward the edge of the deck. The two inch steel ridge around the edge of the carrier slowed him enough so he could roll and twist into the catwalk below the deck. As he later stated, "I was lucky; I could have easily gone overboard."
 
After the fire, Monterey was declared unfit for service and the crippled carrier reached Ulithi on 21 December before preceding across the Pacific to Bremerton, Washington, where it underwent repairs. On Christmas Eve 1944 at Ulithi, Ford was detached from the ship and sent to the Navy Pre-Flight School, St. Mary's College, California, where he was assigned to the Athletic Department until April 1945. One of his duties was to coach football. From the end of April 1945 to January 1946, he was on the staff of the Naval Reserve Training Command, Naval Air Station, Glenview, Illinois, as the Staff Physical and Military Training Officer. On 3 October 1945, he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander. In January 1946, he was sent to the Separation Center, Great Lakes, Illinois, to be outprocessed. He was released from active duty under honorable conditions on 23 February 1946. On 28 June 1963, the Secretary of the Navy accepted Ford's resignation from the Naval Reserve.
 
 
   
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