Anderson, Arthur, F1c

Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Fireman 1st Class
Last Primary Designator/NEC
F1c-0000-Fireman 1st Class
Last Rating/NEC Group
Fireman First Class
Primary Unit
1944-1944, USS Reid (DD-369)
Service Years
1942 - 1944
Fireman 1st Class

 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
California
California
Year of Birth
1923
 
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Casualty Info
Home Town
San Francisco, California
Last Address
San Francisco, California

Casualty Date
Dec 11, 1944
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Drowned, Suffocated
Location
Pacific
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
Manila American Cemetery - Taguig City, Philippines
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Tablets of the Missing

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
World War II FallenWW II Memorial National RegistryThe National Gold Star Family RegistryUnited States Navy Memorial
  2013, World War II Fallen [Verified]
  2013, WW II Memorial National Registry
  2013, The National Gold Star Family Registry
  2013, United States Navy Memorial [Verified] - Assoc. Page

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 Duty Stations
US Navy
  1944-1944, USS Reid (DD-369)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1944-1944 World War II/Asiatic-Pacific Theater
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Not Specified
   
Comments/Citation
NAVY CROSS

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Arthur Anderson (3764609), Fireman First Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty in action against the enemy while serving on board the Destroyer U.S.S. REID (DD-369), in remaining at his battle station beyond the point of escape, while the U.S.S. REID was afire and sinking as the result of an enemy air attack on 11 December 1944. Although his ship was mortally hit, listing sixty degrees, and in imminent danger of sinking, Fireman First Class Anderson remained at his machine gun, alone and up to his waist in water, maintaining an effective fire against the enemy. By such heroic action, he forfeited his opportunity to escape and was carried down with the ship when she sank two minutes after being hit. The gallant courage and utter disregard for personal safety displayed by Fireman First Class Anderson is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
   
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