Kinnick, Nile Clarke, Jr., ENS Fallen
 
 Service Photo   Service Details
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Last Rank
Ensign
Last Primary Designator/NEC
131X-Unrestricted Line Officer - Pilot
Last Rating/NEC Group
Navy Officer
Last Duty Station
1943-1943, VF-16 Pistol Packing Airdales
Service Years
1941 - 1943
Unofficial US Navy Certificates
Suez Canal
Ensign Ensign

 Last Photo   Personal Details 

16 kb

Home State
Iowa
Iowa
Year of Birth
1918
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Adel, Iowa
Last Address
South Atlantic

Casualty Date
Jun 02, 1943
 
Cause
Non Hostile- Died Other Causes
Reason
Air Loss, Crash - Sea
Location
South Atlantic Ocean
Conflict
World War II
Location of Interment
East Coast Memorial (Tablets of the missing) - Manhattan, New York
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Body not recovered.

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
World War II Fallen
  1943, World War II Fallen

 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar

Naval Aviator Wings

 
 Duty Stations
Formal SchoolsNaval Aviation Schools/Naval Aviation Preflight Indoctrination (API), NAS Pensacola, FLNaval Aviation Schools/Naval Strike Fighter Weapons School (Top Gun)NAS Norfolk
VF-16 Pistol Packing Airdales
  1941-1941, 139X, Naval Aviation Schools/Aviation Midshipman Preflight School
  1941-1942, 139X, Naval Aviation Schools/Naval Aviation Preflight Indoctrination (API), NAS Pensacola, FL
  1942-1942, 131X, Naval Aviation Schools/Naval Strike Fighter Weapons School (Top Gun)
  1942-1943, 131X, NAS Norfolk
  1943-1943, VF-16 Pistol Packing Airdales
 Colleges Attended 
University of Iowa
  1936-1940, University of Iowa
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
College Football Player. He was one of college football’s top players and was one of the greatest athletes to have come out of the state of Iowa. He was in Adel, Iowa, he played football for the University of Iowa. During his final season, in the fall of 1939, the Iowa team was picked to finish last in the Big Ten Conference having gone just 2-13-1 the previous two years. However, the Iowa team, lead by Kinnick, went 6-1-1 that season and finished second in the conference. The highlight of the season was Iowa’s 7-6 upset of highly ranked Notre Dame. In that game, he scored the winning touchdown and kicked the extra point. During his senior year he threw for 638 yards and 11 touchdowns on only 31 passes and ran for 374 yards. As a kicker, Kinnick punted 71 times in his career for a 39.9 average and hit 11 of 17 drop kicks. In 1939, he was involved in 16 of the 19 touchdowns (11 passing, 5 rushing) that Iowa scored and was involved in 107 of the 130 points that Iowa scored that year. The 1939 team was nicknamed the Ironmen because most of the players played the entire game. At the end of the season, he won virtually every award in the country. He won the Heisman Trophy, the Walter Camp Award, and the Maxwell Award and in a poll conducted by the AP, he was picked as the nation’s top male athlete of the year beating out such notables as Joe DiMaggio and Joe Louis. Even today, his Heisman acceptance speech is considered the most eloquent and moving ever given. In addition to being a top athlete, he was also a member of Phi Beta Kappa and had a 3.4 grade point average. Instead of going into professional football, he entered the University of Iowa Law School with plans to go into politics. He was a navy pilot during World War II. On June 2, 1943, Kinnick was on a routine training flight from the aircraft carrier “USS Lexington” which was off the coast of Venezuela in the Gulf of Paria. During the flight, his plane developed engine trouble and he was forced to ditch it into the ocean. When the rescue boats arrived at the crash site, there was no trace of the plane or of Kinnick and his body was never recovered. Although forgotten by many people, he is still honored by the people of Iowa and by the Big Ten Conference. In 1989, he was voted the greatest football player in Iowa history. Although many people know that the Iowa football team plays its games in Kinnick Stadium, very few people know that the coin that is flipped at the start of every Big Ten football game has his image on it – a lasting tribute to Iowa’s greatest player.

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