PATTERSON, Daniel Todd, CAPT Deceased
 
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Last Rank
Captain
Last Primary Designator/NEC
114X-Unrestricted Line Officer - qualified in Special Operations
Last Rating/NEC Group
Officer
Last Duty Station
1836-1839, NAVSTA - NAVBASE - NAVFAC- NAB -NOB - NOS/NAVSTA Anacostia/Washington DC
Service Years
1799 - 1839
Captain Captain

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Home State
New York
New York
Year of Birth
1786
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Long Island, New York
Last Address
Daniel Todd Patterson and his wife are buried in Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.

Date of Passing
Aug 25, 1839
 
Location of Interment
Congressional Cemetery - Washington, Washington, DC
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

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Last Known Activity


Commodore Daniel Todd Patterson

Born 1786, died on active duty in 1839
Officer in the United States Navy during the Quasi-War
with France, the First Barbary War and the War of 1812.

 
 
Battle Streamers: Quasi War -- Barbary Wars -- War of 1812



During the War of 1812 Patterson commanded US Naval forces around New Orleans. In September 1814, he refused a request by General Andrew Jackson to send his forces from New Orleans to Mobile. This decision was a fateful one, for in January 1815 the presence and action by Patterson's gunboats in conjunction with Jackson's ground forces at the Battle of New Orleans helped secure an American victory.

6 March 1786. Born, Long Island, New York

Between June 1799 and August 1800 ‎(Age 13)‎ Midshipman on the USS Delaware in the Caribbean during the 'Quasi-War with France'.

1803 ‎(Age 16)‎ Blockade duty against Barbary pirates off Tripoli.

Between 13 October 1803 and 1805 ‎(Age 17)‎ Held prisoner by Barbary pirates after the capture of the USS Philadelphia.

1807 ‎(Age 20)‎
Promoted to Lieutenant.

Between 1812 and 1813 ‎(Age 25)‎ Commander at New Orleans during the War of 1812.

16 September 1814 ‎(Age 28)‎ Raided the base of pirate Jean Laffite at Barataria, Louisiana.

December 1814 ‎(Age 28)‎ Directed delaying actions against the British fleet approaching New Orleans.

28 February 1815 ‎(Age 28)‎ Promoted to Captain.

Between 1824 and 1828 ‎(Age 37)‎ Fleet captain and commander of the flagship USS Constitution in Commodore John Rodgers' Mediterranean Squadron.

1828 ‎(Age 41)‎ Appointed Navy Commissioner.

Between 1832 and 1836 ‎(Age 45)‎ Commander of the Mediterranean Squadron.

Between 1836 and 1839 ‎(Age 49)‎ Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard.

25 August 1839 ‎(Age 53)‎ Died, Wilmington, New Jersey.


Daniel Todd Patterson was born on Long Island, New York, on 6 March 1786. He entered the U.S. Navy as an acting Midshipman* in 1799, and had Quasi-War with France service in the frigate Delaware. During the war with Tripoli he served in the frigates Constitution and Philadelphia, becoming a prisoner of war when the latter was captured on 31 October 1803. Released in 1805, Midshipman* Patterson was assigned to duty at New Orleans, Louisiana. He served there for nearly two decades, attaining the ranks of Lieutenant in 1807 and Master Commandant in 1812. Later in 1812 Patterson took command of the New Orleans station. In 1814 he led an amphibious attack on a pirate town in Barataria Bay and in December directed Naval forces in actions that significantly delayed the British approach to New Orleans. The following month, Master Commandant Patterson distinguished himself in action with the British during the Battle of New Orleans.

Promoted to Captain at the end of February 1815, Patterson's service at New Orleans continued until 1824, when he took command of the frigate Constitution. He was appointed a Navy Commissioner in 1828. In 1832-1836 he commanded the Mediterranean Squadron, with the title of Commodore**, Subsequently, Patterson was Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard, holding that post until he died on 25 August 1839.

The U.S. Navy has named three ships in honor of Daniel Todd Patterson, including: USS Patterson (Destroyer # 36, later DD-36) of 1911-1934; USS Patterson (DD-392) of 1937-1947; and USS Patterson (DE-1061, later FF-1061) of 1970-1999.

   
Other Comments:

Rank of Midshipman:

*As acting midshipman, he joined sloop of war Delaware, June 11, 1799, to cruise against French privateers and warships in the West Indies to August 1800. Appointed Midshipman, U.S. Navy, August 20, 1800 (warrant subsequently altered to take rank from date of his original entry, June 11, 1799). After the war, he was one of the Midshipmen retained in the Navy under the Peace Establishment Act, signed by President Adams in one of his last official acts, on March 3, 1801.

Rank of Commodore:

**Although Patterson is properly called a "Commodore", during his years in the Navy this was not one of the hierarchical "line" ranks. Instead, "Commodore" applied to any officer in command of a fleet of two or more ships, regardless of the officer's "line" rank at the time, and regardless of whether the officer also held the dual role of commanding officer of one of the ships in the fleet. Thus Patterson was a Commodore at the time of the Battle of New Orleans because he commanded a fleet of ships, even though he was not promoted to the "line" rank of Captain until after the battle. He again became a Commodore when in command of the Mediterranean Squadron. Patterson was never an Admiral because in his day the highest "line" rank in the US Navy was Captain; the title Admiral was felt to smack of aristocracy and royalty, and did not become a "line" rank in the US Navy until the Civil War.


   
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  Biography: Daniel Todd Patterson
   
Date
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Last Updated:
Oct 24, 2011
   
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Daniel Todd Patterson (March 6, 1786 ? August 25, 1839) was an officer in the United States Navy during the Quasi-War with France, the First Barbary War and the War of 1812.

Biography:

Patterson was born on Long Island, New York. His father, John Patterson, was a younger brother of Walter Patterson, who was the first Royal Governor of Prince Edward Island (then named St. John's Island). John and Walter came to America in the 1750s from Ramelton or Rathmullan, County Donegal, Ireland, and served in the British Army in the French and Indian War. Daniel Patterson's mother, Catherine Livingston, was a daughter of the "Third Lord of the Manor" of Livingston, Robert Livingston (1708?1790) (also see Livingston family). James Duane, a respected lawyer, patriot, New York politician, and judge, was Daniel Patterson's uncle (by marriage to Patterson's aunt, his mother's sister Mary Livingston).

As acting midshipman, he joined sloop of war Delaware, June 11, 1799, to cruise against French privateers and warships in the West Indies to August 1800. Appointed Midshipman, U.S. Navy, August 20, 1800 (warrant subsequently altered to take rank from date of his original entry, June 11, 1799). After the war, was one of the Midshipmen retained in the Navy under the Peace Establishment Act, signed by President Adams in one of his last official acts, on March 3, 1801. On close of the Quasi-War with France, he resumed nautical studies, then had blockade duty off Tripoli in famed Constellation and Philadelphia. He fell prisoner upon capture of Philadelphia on October 13, 1803, and remained a captive of the Barbary pirates until the American victory over Tripoli in 1805.

Upon returning home, he spent much of his following years on station at New Orleans, Louisiana, where he took command after the outbreak of the War of 1812. On September 16, 1814, Patterson raided the base of the pirate Jean Laffite at Barataria, Louisiana, capturing six schooners and other small craft. In that same month, he refused Andrew Jackson's request to send his few naval units to Mobile Bay where Patterson knew they would be bottled up by a superior British fleet. Foreseeing British designs against New Orleans almost two months before their attack, Patterson, not Jackson, was the first to prepare to defend the city. The victory resulted as much from his foresight and preparations as from Jackson's able fighting. His little fleet delayed the enemy until reinforcements arrived, then gave artillery support in defense of the entrenchments from which Jackson was never driven.

Patterson, highly commended by Jackson, received a note of thanks from Congress, and was promoted to Captain on February 28, 1815. Patterson remained on the southern stations until 1824 when he became fleet captain and commander of flagship USS Constitution in Commodore John Rodgers' Mediterranean Squadron.

Returning home in 1828, he was appointed one of the three Navy commissioners. He commanded the Mediterranean Squadron from 1832?1836. He then took command of the Washington Navy Yard in 1836, an office he held until his death at Wilmington, New Jersey, August 25, 1839. Daniel Todd Patterson and his wife are buried in Congressional Cemetery, Washington, D.C.

   
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Daniel Todd Patterson
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